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Balancing mobility and stability

Discussion in 'Biomechanics, Sports and Foot orthoses' started by scotfoot, Jul 23, 2017.

  1. scotfoot

    scotfoot Active Member


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    So listening to this interview , core stability is not about limiting movement but about control of movement and core strengthening exercise programmes designed around limiting movement are not generally a good idea . So I am guessing then that static hold type exercises are lees than optimal . That being the case then, in terms of the trunk , out would go the plank and ,with regard to the foot , out goes the short foot exercise .

    Paul Hodges: Balancing mobility and stability - YouTube


    upload_2017-7-23_19-6-5.jpeg ▶ 9:45

    9 Feb 2015 - Uploaded by British Journal of Sports Medicine (BJSM)
    Professor Paul Hodges, University of Queensland, debunks common misconceptions around core stability. It ...
     
  2. scotfoot

    scotfoot Active Member

    So with regard to the above, and in my opinion , if you wanted to strengthen the intrinsic muscles of the foot and so provide a more functionally responsive foot core , you would use the the proven resistance band exercises of Mickle . (1)


    (1)
    Efficacy of a progressive resistance exercise program to ... - NCBI

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27780109
    by KJ Mickle - ‎2016 - ‎Cited by 1 - ‎Related articles
    Efficacy of a progressive resistance exercise program to increase toe flexor strength in older people. Mickle ... Electronic address: Karen.mickle@vu.edu.au.
     
  3. scotfoot

    scotfoot Active Member

    Looking at post 1 above , how useful would the plank or plank rows be to a golfer ? Golf is very much a rotational sport and , going by the my interpretation of the words of Prof Paul Hodges (above video) , static core strengthening is not ideal .
    I recently had a look at the gym regime used by Rory McIlroy and for core strength he uses the plank and plank rows .
    Why ?

    Rory McIlroy gym routine - Golf Monthly

    www.golf-monthly.co.uk › News › Home17 Oct 2016 - In this exclusive feature, Neil Tappin joins Rory McIlroy for a full training session. What goes in to the Rory McIlroy gym routine and how tough is ...
     
  4. scotfoot

    scotfoot Active Member

    One other thing strikes me about the Rory McIlroy's routine and that is the apparent lack of progressive resistance training for the intrinsic muscles of the feet . The intrinsic muscles are known to become more active with increasing postural demand and to have an important role in balance .
    A professional golfer is a pretty finely tuned sports person and many hours of practice are involved in honing technique . But what happens if the power produced by the rest of the body is increased but the strength of the intrinsic remains unchanged ? Might it be that the muscles of the feet can no longer perform in a constant fashion during the golf swing if gym routines increase leg strength but not foot strength ?

    If you are going to introduce progressive resistance training for the legs then perhaps you should do the same for the feet to keep a balance between the two .

    Here is one of the most insightful papers on intrinsic muscle strengthening to date -
    Efficacy of a progressive resistance exercise program to ... - NCBI

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27780109
    by KJ Mickle - ‎2016 - ‎Cited by 1 - ‎Related articles
    Electronic address: Karen.mickle@vu.edu.au. ... However it is unknown whether strengtheningprograms can restore toe flexor strength in older individuals.
     
  5. scotfoot

    scotfoot Active Member

    Further to the above , a lot has been said about weight distribution at address and weight shift during execution of the golf swing . However , a fairly recent article by a PGA golf coach , Bill Schmedes ,makes things a lot clearer . Simply put , force plate technology has shown that regardless of how things look to the naked eye , all top golfers spread their weight and move their center of pressure in a very similar way . However , perhaps most interestingly from a balance /intrinsic muscle point of view , the evidence shows that during the swing , top players apply the majority of force generated to the ground through the forefoot and not the heel . In this stance the intrinsics likely have an even more important role to play than if the ground reaction forces were being generated more evenly between the heel and the ball of the foot .

    So , based in part on this article (below) , if a top golfer increases leg power through training and can then cause greater ground reaction forces to be developed , it might be wise to strengthen the feet /intrinsics to maintain a consistent swing that does not become unpredictable with increasing effort .

    The difference between professionals and amateurs is in the ground ...

    www.golfwrx.com › Instruction28 Apr 2014 - Ok, the difference between amateur and professionals isn't necessarily in the ground. It's more about how you use it. We all enjoy watching the
     
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