Welcome to the Podiatry Arena forums

You are currently viewing our podiatry forum as a guest which gives you limited access to view all podiatry discussions and access our other features. By joining our free global community of Podiatrists and other interested foot health care professionals you will have access to post podiatry topics (answer and ask questions), communicate privately with other members, upload content, view attachments, receive a weekly email update of new discussions, access other special features. Registered users do not get displayed the advertisements in posted messages. Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please, join our global Podiatry community today!

  1. Everything that you are ever going to want to know about running shoes: Running Shoes Boot Camp Online, for taking it to the next level? See here for more.
    Dismiss Notice
  2. Have you considered the Critical Thinking and Skeptical Boot Camp, for taking it to the next level? See here for more.
    Dismiss Notice
  3. Have you considered the Clinical Biomechanics Boot Camp Online, for taking it to the next level? See here for more.
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Have you considered the Clinical Biomechanics Boot Camp Online, for taking it to the next level? See here for more.
Dismiss Notice
Have you liked us on Facebook to get our updates? Please do. Click here for our Facebook page.
Dismiss Notice
Do you get the weekly newsletter that Podiatry Arena sends out to update everybody? If not, click here to organise this.

Biomechanics & Foot Orthotics in the 21st Century: you NEED this book (why Dr. Kirby is wrong)

Discussion in 'Biomechanics, Sports and Foot orthoses' started by Dieter Fellner, Feb 28, 2014.

  1. Dieter Fellner

    Dieter Fellner Well-Known Member


    Members do not see these Ads. Sign Up.
    The dogmatic world of podiatric biomechanics, as taught when I took my first baby ‘biomechanics’ steps in the 80s, was much easier to understand. What I had learned, I applied. What I applied worked: most of the time. In the 90s my simplistic understanding was thrown into chaos. Piece by piece, under the scrutiny of scientific enquiry and deductive reasoning, the podiatric ‘code’ tumbled and crumbled. This created a confusion and a crises: for practical, clinical purpose the orthotic device appeared to work well enough, yet clinical research cast ever more doubt on commonly accepted doctrine. During quiet moments of reflection and intellectual honesty, I grew ever less confident in my knowledge to explain why and how my treatments are effective. Nor was it possible to reason why treatments sometimes proved ineffective. Applying the tool of conventional wisdom, which I was taught, did not seem to help.

    Dr. Kirby has gifted Podiatry with the publication of “Foot & Lower Extremity Biomechanics IV: Precision Intricast Newsletters, 2009-13”. This latest addition to the collection is a treasure trove, and a delight.

    Through his publications Dr. Kirby has made a very significant contribution to provide a better understanding of 21st Century biomechanics. One that integrates biological plausibility with theoretical coherence, and one that is consistent with the best available evidence. Applied physics and engineering principles provide new tools that sharpen and improve our knowledge of how an orthosis can work. And how to make the technology work better, and more consistently so.

    Dr. Kirby spares no effort to share this knowledge unselfishly, free from the shackles of commercial interest, and obscure trade secret. At a time when there is a fear this unique, essential aspect of practice may be lost, there can be renewed hope and empowerment. The Podiatrist has hope to reclaim the position of authority as the ‘go-to’ doctor. Dr. Kirby’s combined body of work can offer the reader, both novice and experienced, a more effective means to understand, and the practical detail to be successful.

    Adding to the preceding three volumes there is a wealth of knowledge and experience offered in this latest compilation. This fourth book is a plentiful resource, embracing the familiar as well as the challenging. Information is delivered in a style that is lucid and logical, but also easy to follow. The book offers insight and unique perspective on many topics of current interest and of direct relevance to the busy practitioner. From sesamoiditis to barefoot running, Dr. Kirby draws on his impressive clinical and academic prowess, gathered over a 30+ year career in the study and delivery of Podiatry. Very few are as accomplished as he is.

    With a solid foundation first provided from an extensive interaction with the god-fathers of podiatric biomechanics he completed a biomechanics fellowship. Since then he has managed not only to run a successful, busy office but also finds time, somehow, to teach and to make a permanent record of a lifetime achievement, preserved in this fine collection of works. In the process Dr. Kirby has acquired an enviable international reputation as a teacher, lecturer and friend. There are many accomplished workers in Podiatry who improve our knowledge and understanding. There are few others, if any, who can also claim to leave so extensive a record of a lifetime of devotion and work.

    Why is he wrong? In his 4th book Dr. Kirby is concerned about the future of Podiatry. Today’s Podiatrist no longer has the benefit of a fellowship in biomechanics. The focus in residency now: to provide extensive education and experience in medicine and surgery. The podiatric biomechanics expert is becoming an endangered species. I cannot disagree with that assessment.

    Working my way through residency, during this second incarnation of my life in Podiatry, I have to concede that education in the US pays lip-service to podiatric biomechanics. This experience is very different to the education I first received, some 27 years ago when biomechanics was the focus of education. The new academic system, sadly, is to some extent, failing the up and coming generation of Podiatrists.

    I live in hope, and firmly believe that a future generation of Podiatrists can succeed. There is among my colleagues, students and residents a thirst for knowledge. There is appreciation for the fact that podiatric biomechanics will be a significant part in their professional life. I am assured further in the knowledge that Dr. Kirby’s continuing effort, diligently recorded and readily available will provide a key contribution, to ensure that 21st Century podiatric biomechanics can and will survive.

    Dr. Kirby is a master’s master. This 4th Volume is an absolute requirement on the bookshelf of every Podiatrist, and podiatry student. Put it right next to his other 3 volumes: your patient will thank you for it!


    [​IMG]
     
  2. Rob Kidd

    Rob Kidd Well-Known Member

    Dieter, I hear what you say - you may or may not be right - I am not in a position to say. However, I am glad - honoured even - to have been a major player in your first incarnation
     
  3. Dieter Fellner

    Dieter Fellner Well-Known Member

    Rob:

    My comments relate only to the US. More specifically my own immediate experience. Similar sentiments are expressed by others. I am not in a position to know what's happening elsewhere in the world.

    Thank you for your nice comments!

    DJF
     
  4. Dr. Steven King

    Dr. Steven King Well-Known Member

    Aloha,

    I do not understand your logic here. Is Dr. Kirby right or wrong about his assesment that podiatric biomechanical experts are becoming an endangered species?

    Here is your statement,
    "Why is he wrong? In his 4th book Dr. Kirby is concerned about the future of Podiatry. Today’s Podiatrist no longer has the benefit of a fellowship in biomechanics. The focus in residency now: to provide extensive education and experience in medicine and surgery. The podiatric biomechanics expert is becoming an endangered species. I cannot disagree[/B] with that assessment."

    Dr. Kirby has been an honored "veteran statemen" of podiatry. But to maintain that reputation it is important not to "Ignor" important new technologies and their impact on our profession, even if they may disrupt and expand the current knowledge base.

    Advanced Composite Lever Spring Orthotics should not be ignored and should be at the forefront of our research and discussions,, and book topics.

    We will look forward to Dr. Kirby's input and comments into advanced composites and simple machine orthotics,, if he happens to perhaps maybe mention them in his Next next book...

    ...if you are going to stay ahead of the curve you have to stay ahead of the curve.

    "Dr. Kirby has made a very significant contribution to provide a better understanding of 21st Century biomechanics. One that integrates biological plausibility with theoretical coherence, and one that is consistent with the best available evidence. Applied physics and engineering principles provide new tools that sharpen and improve our knowledge of how an orthosis can work. And how to make the technology work better, and more consistently so."

    Personally, i am doing everything i can to Proove that Dr. Kirby is wrong about the demise by establishing with proven research results that podiatric biomechanics is alive is ready for whole bunch of new fertile offspring.

    Mahalo,
    Steve

    Advanced Composite Maximalist Lever Spring Machine Orthosis Runner

    Co-Principal Investigator SBIR A11-109 "Advanced Composite Insoles for the Reduction of Stress Fractures." US DoD and Army Medical Research Command
     
  5. dropatoeor2

    dropatoeor2 Active Member

    Dieter (if I may),

    Terrific book review. Based on that I'm going to check out Dr. Kirby's book. Anyone as dedicated to generate several titles certainly has a perspective that's been lost over the years.
     
Loading...

Share This Page