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Chronic Exertional Compartment Syndrome

Discussion in 'Biomechanics, Sports and Foot orthoses' started by Sheppl, Jul 19, 2013.

  1. Sheppl

    Sheppl Welcome New Poster


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    Hi all,
    A friend of mine is experiencing posterior lower leg pain and tightness after running. There is a history of explosive running after poor to little warm up and no cool down, visible and palpable tightness of the posterior leg muscles after running and tightness after a set duration of activity which resolves after a couple of minutes of rest. This has led me to believe it's CECS, I have no way of determining the inter-compartmental pressures although from reading around the subject Aweid et al (2012) suggest these are not reliable.
    I have noticed several comments on articles suggesting that re-training the individual into a forefoot strike whilst running can be of benefit.
    I was hoping that you could offer your opinions on the following points:


    1- Is there a definitive way of testing for CECS without inter-compartmental pressure testing?
    2- What's everyone's opinion on inter-compartmental pressure testing and should I be advising her to see an orthopaedic surgeon to get tested/ treated?
    3- Is re-training the best non-surgical treatment for this? And can you advise of any articles that explain this in more detail?
    4- From my research the suggestion (admittedly from surgeons) is that surgery is the best bet does anyone have any experience with this?

    I have an interest in biomechanics but am by no means experienced or knowledgable about it so if i'm completely barking up the wrong tree please do let me know!
    Cheers,
    Laura
     
  2. Craig Payne

    Craig Payne Moderator

    Articles:
    6
    Very bad idea if it is a posterior compartment problem --> will probably make it worse.

    Most of the comments you might have read were about probably about anterior compartment --> very good idea to forefoot strike (or at least change the touchdown angle).
     
  3. Admin2

    Admin2 Administrator Staff Member

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