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Clinical effectiveness of customised sport shoe orthoses for overuse injuries in runners: a randomis

Discussion in 'Biomechanics, Sports and Foot orthoses' started by Athol Thomson, Aug 26, 2011.

  1. Athol Thomson

    Athol Thomson Active Member


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    This study was published in the print edition of the British Journal of Sports Medicine Sept 2011 but was published online in 2009.

    I'll try and get a pdf of full study (Ian G might be able to assist?). Would be interested in any thoughts on the methodology and stats etc?

    Regards,
    Athol



    http://bjsm.bmj.com/content/early/2010/06/01/bjsm.2008.055830.abstract




    Clinical effectiveness of customised sport shoe orthoses for overuse injuries in runners: a randomised controlled study

    A Hirschmüller1,2,
    H Baur3,
    S Müller3,
    P Helwig1,
    H-H Dickhuth2,




    Abstract

    Background and objectives Treatment of chronic running-related overuse injuries by orthopaedic shoe orthoses is very common but not evidence-based to date.

    Hypothesis Polyurethane foam orthoses adapted to a participant's barefoot plantar pressure distribution are an effective treatment option for chronic overuse injuries in runners.

    Design Prospective, randomised, controlled clinical trial.

    Intervention 51 patients with running injuries were treated with custom-made, semirigid running shoe orthoses for 8 weeks. 48 served as a randomised control group that continued regular training activity without any treatment.

    Main outcome measures Evaluation was made by the validated pain questionnaire Subjective Pain Experience Scale, the pain disability index and a comfort index in the orthoses group (ICI).

    Results There were statistically significant differences between the orthoses and control groups at 8 weeks for the pain disability index (mean difference 3.2; 95% CI 0.9 to 5.5) and the Subjective Pain Experience Scale (6.6; 2.6 to 10.6). The patients with orthoses reported a rising wearing comfort (pre-treatment ICI 69/100; post-treatment ICI 83/100) that was most pronounced in the first 4 weeks (ICI 80.4/100).

    Conclusion Customised polyurethane running shoe orthoses are an effective conservative therapy strategy for chronic running injuries with high comfort and acceptance of injured runners.
     
  2. Griff

    Griff Moderator

  3. reillyshoe

    reillyshoe Member

    "Based on recent evidence, a healthcare professional or a biomechanist is not able to predict the kinematics, kinetics and/or EMG out-comes produced through FO intervention."
    Effectiveness of foot orthoses for treatment and prevention of lower limb injuries : a review. Hume P, Hopkins W, Rome K, Maulder P, Coyle G, Nigg B. Sports Med. 2008;38(9):759-79.

    Is the difference between these two studies the ability to manage pain (as opposed to predicting the kinematic effect of the orthotic)?
     
  4. Athol Thomson

    Athol Thomson Active Member

    There is no mention of motion analysis or collection of kinematic data in the Hirschmuller study. A Novel pressure platform is used to help pick which orthotic modification to use on the prefab I think?

    They used a pain disability index, subjective pain experience scale and comfort index of orthoses.

    The authors assess lower limb disability, pain and orthoses comfort of runners who are able to do an average of 44kms per week (of running) for 8 weeks.

    I'm not great at journal critique so just wanted to see what others though of it.

    Regards,
    Athol
     
    Last edited: Aug 26, 2011
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