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Do hard courts shorten pro tennis players careers?

Discussion in 'Biomechanics, Sports and Foot orthoses' started by NewsBot, Sep 14, 2012.

  1. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

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    Do hard courts shorten pro tennis players’ careers?
     
  2. Re: Do hard courts shorten pro tennis players’ careers?

    Possibly. I'm not one for playing with balls - much prefer the cock.....or rather shuttlecock! Have played badminton at a fairly high level - county juniors and seniors - and still manage to work up a decent sweat on court most weeks and from my experience, playing on sprung wooden floors is infinitely preferable to playing on solid floors- even with mats down. If I have to play on the latter, I usually take 400mgs ibuprofen before and after a match - and even then I have difficulty next morning with knees and back, whereas on a sprung floor, next morning, I'm just my usual magnificent self! Solid floors and high impact sports just don't bode well for the old bones and clubs that play regularly on these surfaces tend to have a higher number of injuries in their teams than those who have a sprung floor.

    Friends who play with their balls usually say the same about grass-v-clay and all-weather...
     
  3. Griff

    Griff Moderator

    Re: Do hard courts shorten pro tennis players’ careers?

    On reading some of the writing on he subject of leg stiffness from Farley, Ferris, Spooner etc, one could say that Rafa's patella tendon pathology is easily explained:

    Hard court (surface) = CNS driven response in increasing leg compliance (one mechanism being increased knee flexion)
    Increased leg compliance = thought to increase risk or likelihood of soft tissue injury (such as tendinopathies)
     
  4. Bruce Williams

    Bruce Williams Well-Known Member

    Re: Do hard courts shorten pro tennis players’ careers?

    There are also mechanical reasons for the same response. Those can be identified, quantified and treated fairly easily.

    How exactly do you identify, quantify and treat a so-called CNS driven response?

    Bruce
     
  5. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
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    The influence of tennis court surfaces on player perceptions and biomechanical response
    Chelsea Starbuck et al
    Journal of Sports Sciences; in press
     
  6. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

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    Tennis injury data from The Championships, Wimbledon, from 2003 to 2012
    I McCurdie et al
    Br J Sports Med doi:10.1136/bjsports-2015-095552
     
  7. fishpod

    fishpod Well-Known Member

    read a study from staffs uni that netball players had more injuries on hard courts than sprung courts. so probably in tennis aswell.
     
  8. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

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    Editorial
    It's not the destination, it's the ‘road to load’ that matters: a tennis injury prevention perspective

    Dr Babette M Pluim
    Br J Sports Med 2016;50:641-642
     
  9. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
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    Biomechanical responses to changes in friction on a clay court surface
    Chelsea Starbuck et al
    Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport; 1 September 2016
     
  10. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

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    Injury rates in recreational tennis players do not differ between different playing surfaces
    Babette M Pluim, Benjamin Clarsen, Evert Verhagen
    BJSM
     
  11. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
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    The influence of tennis court surfaces on player perceptions and biomechanical response.
    Starbuck C et al
    J Sports Sci. 2016 Sep;34(17):1627-36. doi: 10.1080/02640414.2015.112798
     
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