Welcome to the Podiatry Arena forums

You are currently viewing our podiatry forum as a guest which gives you limited access to view all podiatry discussions and access our other features. By joining our free global community of Podiatrists and other interested foot health care professionals you will have access to post podiatry topics (answer and ask questions), communicate privately with other members, upload content, view attachments, receive a weekly email update of new discussions, access other special features. Registered users do not get displayed the advertisements in posted messages. Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please, join our global Podiatry community today!

  1. Everything that you are ever going to want to know about running shoes: Running Shoes Boot Camp Online, for taking it to the next level? See here for more.
    Dismiss Notice
  2. Have you considered the Critical Thinking and Skeptical Boot Camp, for taking it to the next level? See here for more.
    Dismiss Notice
  3. Have you considered the Clinical Biomechanics Boot Camp Online, for taking it to the next level? See here for more.
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Have you considered the Clinical Biomechanics Boot Camp Online, for taking it to the next level? See here for more.
Dismiss Notice
Have you liked us on Facebook to get our updates? Please do. Click here for our Facebook page.
Dismiss Notice
Do you get the weekly newsletter that Podiatry Arena sends out to update everybody? If not, click here to organise this.

Effects of orthotics on high and low arched feet

Discussion in 'Biomechanics, Sports and Foot orthoses' started by NewsBot, Sep 2, 2008.

  1. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1

    Members do not see these Ads. Sign Up.
    A comparison of semi-custom and custom foot orthotic devices in high- and low-arched individuals during walking
    Rebecca Avrin Zifchock, Irene Davis
    Clinical Biomechanics (Articles in Press)
     
  2. David Smith

    David Smith Well-Known Member

    How many times are people going to keep making useless comparisons and statistical analysis of interventions to prove how well the do or don't work?

    If I like coffee flavoured sweets and I read statistical data that most people like strawberry flavour sweets it still doesn't make me dislike coffee flavour or like strawbwerry falvour more.

    And the same for orthoses, you can statistically analyse how well a certain orthosis design works for a group or population of people but that will not give you any idea about how that design will work for your individual patient.

    If you have a treatment protocol that says everybody that has to much pronation is dysfunctional therefore retarding that motion will improve function then fair enough you can keep prescribing any orthosis that research shows reduces pronation as well as any other orthosis design.

    This can be great for large organisations that only care about paperwork, statistics and want to be seen to be using evidence based medicine at all costs. (where evidence means documentable, repeatable and statistically supported outcomes) This however, in my opinion, is not how we should apply our biomechanical knowledge. I believe in individual interventions for individuals.

    Dave Smith
     
  3. Craig Payne

    Craig Payne Moderator

    Articles:
    6
    Couldn't agree more!

    That why we did this study:
    Despite its limitations, its one study I quite proud of as it was the first to actually look at that statisical change the orthotic made to the foot (which is what a lot of other studies did) and then compare that change to the change in symptoms (which no one else had done).
     
  4. David Smith

    David Smith Well-Known Member

    Craig


    From your paper

    Yes this is far more relevant and indicative of the futility of trying to correlate kinematic changes in a population with symptom relief in a particular person in that population.

    I believe that, in terms of intervention design for the purpose of reduction of pathology, logical reasoning, ie deductive logic, is more useful than solely relying on statistical analysis of inductive reasoning from observational data.

    Empirical data gathered from individuals are always confounded by the unfathomable variables that exist within the individual. Without control of these variables how can it be valid to make a universal statement reasoned from a few singular observations and then reverse that logic by applying the universal statement to a singular individual when that individual may contain all or none of the variables not accounted for but none the less, influential in the intial observation.

    Is it just me :empathy:

    LoL Dave
     
  5. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Effect of foot orthoses on magnitude and timing of rearfoot and tibial motions, ground reaction force and knee moment during running.
    Eslami M, Begon M, Hinse S, Sadeghi H, Popov P, Allard P.
    J Sci Med Sport. 2008 Sep 1. [Epub ahead of print]
     
Loading...

Share This Page