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Effects of soft orthotics on sEMG activity of superficial leg muscles during walking with supinated

Discussion in 'Biomechanics, Sports and Foot orthoses' started by NewsBot, Jan 10, 2013.

  1. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1

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    Effects of soft orthotics on sEMG activity of superficial leg muscles during walking with supinated feet.
    Azizpour, S.; Anbarian, M.
    Scientific Journal of Kurdistan University of Medical Sciences 2012 Vol. 17 No. 3 pp. Pe11-Pe19, En2
     
  2. Admin2

    Admin2 Administrator Staff Member

  3. efuller

    efuller MVP

    This should be linked to the clarifying biomechanics thread where we are disscussing different foot types that could have a high lateral load. It does make me appreciate the reason that Mert Root proposed classifying based on STJ neutral. Different feet behave differently. Just taking cavus feet is not enough of a differentiation. If you treat them with same orthotic you will get the results seen here. The results may have been more consistent if STJ axis location and maximum eversion height were used to separate the patients into different groups.

    Eric
     
  4. David Smith

    David Smith Well-Known Member

    Here's a paper along the same lines that has similar conclusions

    Dave Smith
     

    Attached Files:

  5. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Muscle activation during fast walking with two types of foot orthoses in participants with cavus feet
    GabrielMoisanabcMartinDescarreauxbcVincentCantinbc
    Journal of Electromyography and Kinesiology; 18 August 2018
     
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