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Falls prevention

Discussion in 'Gerontology' started by NewsBot, May 13, 2006.

  1. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
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    The development & effect of an tailored falls prevention exercise for older adults.
    Taehan Kanho Hakhoe Chi. 2006 Apr;36(2):341-52
     
  2. Admin2

    Admin2 Administrator Staff Member

  3. Hylton Menz

    Hylton Menz Guest

    Here's the most recent systematic review of exercise interventions for falls (more recent than the last Cochrane update in 2003). The important thing to highlight here is that all the included studies used falls over 12 months as the primary outcome measure, rather than physical performance measures:

    Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport 2004 Apr;7(1 Suppl):43-51.


    Physical activity interventions to prevent falls among older people: update of the evidence

    Sherrington C, Lord SR, Finch CF.

    Prince of Wales Medical Research Institute, The University of New South Wales, Australia.

    Injuries resulting from falls are a significant public health issue, particularly for older people. This review provides an update of the evidence on the effects of various physical activity (PA) or exercise intervention strategies for the prevention of unintentional falls among older people. Six systematic reviews, and three randomised controlled trials not incorporated in previous reviews, were located with a literature search. There is clear evidence that a targeted supervised home exercise program of strength and balance exercise and walking practice, prescribed by a trained health professional, can prevent falls among older community dwellers. There is also an indication that untargeted group exercise (ie, not individually prescribed) can prevent falls among community dwellers, particularly if it involves Tai Chi or other exercises which challenge balance. There is some indication that individual prescription of PA is more important in frailer groups. Further investigation is required to establish the effects of PA in residential aged care, and the relative effects of different types of PA in different populations. In addition, multidisciplinary, multifactorial. health/environmental risk factor screening/intervention programs have been found to be effective in preventing falls. For many individuals with physical risk factors for falls (eg, impaired strength, balance or functional ability), PA alone is likely to reduce the risk of falls. For those with additional risk factors (eg, visual impairments, psychoactive medication use), other interventions may also be required.
     
  4. Hylton Menz

    Hylton Menz Guest

    The 2nd edition of Falls in Older people: Risk Factors and Strategies for Prevention has just been published. Click on the cover for more details.

    [​IMG]
     
  5. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Modifiable performance domain risk-factors associated with slip-related falls.
    Troy KL, Donovan SJ, Marone JR, Bareither ML, Grabiner MD.
    Gait Posture. 2008 Apr 4 [Epub ahead of print]
     
  6. Boots n all

    Boots n all Well-Known Member

    Re: Falls prevention with perspective !

    You have to laugh, l recently purchased a copy of "Falls in Older people: Risk Factors and Strategies for Prevention ", my father sat in the factory lunch room and read a page or two while the kettle boiled.:morning:
    Page 5 gives a "Definition of the older person"
    "The term is used for age-groups starting from as low as 50 years. However, the most frequently used is people aged 65 years and over. Within this age- band, commonly accepted subgroups are those aged 65 -74 years, 75 - 84 and 85 years and older"

    My father put down the book and said..... "It's all about perspective isn't it, the 35 year old researcher thought 55 years was old and the 55 year old researcher thought 75 years was old, let these researchers know l am just shy of middle age at 74 years of age.:empathy:
     
  7. Re: Falls prevention with perspective !

    Dave:

    After considerable research, I have discovered a new, fundamental law of nature, Age Relativity. I have determined that, every year, my definitions for "old" and "young" increase by exactly one year of age.

    For example, when I was 10 years old, I thought that 15 was old, but when I became 20, I thought 15 was young. When I was 30, I though that 35 was old but when I became 40, I thought that 35 was young. Therefore, every year, my definitions for "old' and "young" have increased by exactly one year. So that now that I'm 51, even 46 year olds are young, while 56 year olds are still old.

    This new fundamental law of nature has been established and confirmed utilizing multiple interviews of my patients and other individuals who will tolerate my questions. My paper on Age Relativity will soon be published in the Journal of Ageless Theories. ;):pigs::rolleyes:
     
    Last edited: May 3, 2008
  8. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Preventing falls in older adults: new interventions to promote more effective change-in-support balance reactions.
    Maki BE, Cheng KC, Mansfield A, Scovil CY, Perry SD, Peters AL, McKay S, Lee T, Marquis A, Corbeil P, Fernie GR, Liu B, McIlroy WE
    J Electromyogr Kinesiol. 2008 Apr;18(2):243-54
     
  9. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Exercise training can improve spatial characteristics of time-critical obstacle avoidance in elderly people.
    Weerdesteyn V, Nienhuis B, Duysens J
    Hum Mov Sci. 2008 Jun 2;
     
  10. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Does a functional activity programme improve function, quality of life, and falls for residents in long term care? Cluster randomised controlled trial
    Ngaire Kerse, Kathy Peri, Elizabeth Robinson, Tim Wilkinson, Martin von Randow, Liz Kiata, John Parsons, Nancy Latham, Matthew Parsons, Jane Willingale, Paul Brown, and Bruce Arroll
    BMJ 2008;337:a1445, doi: 10.1136/bmj.a1445 (Published 9 October 2008)
     
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