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Foot orthoses and the cavus foot

Discussion in 'Biomechanics, Sports and Foot orthoses' started by NewsBot, May 17, 2006.

  1. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1

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    Effective Orthotic Therapy for the Painful Cavus Foot
    A Randomized Controlled Trial
    Joshua Burns, PhD, Jack Crosbie, PhD , Robert Ouvrier, MD and Adrienne Hunt, PhD
    Journal of the American Podiatric Medical Association Volume 96 Number 3 205-211 2006
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 18, 2006
  2. Admin2

    Admin2 Administrator Staff Member

  3. Awesome job Josh and coworkers!!!! I will immediately add your extremely valuable research to my lecture titled "Foot Orthoses: Theory and Research Evidence for Their Biomechanical Effects".

    Congratulations on your continuing work to improve the research evidence supporting the use of custom foot orthoses for certain pathological conditions of the foot and lower extremity.
     
  4. Josh Burns

    Josh Burns Active Member

    Thank you Kevin,
    I am looking forward to presenting this study (and others) at the PFOLA Meeting in Chicago Dec 1-3.
    Kind regards

    Joshua Burns PhD, B App Sc (Pod) Hons

    NHMRC Australian Clinical Research Fellow
    Institute for Neuromuscular Research
    The Children's Hospital at Westmead
    Sydney, Australia
     
  5. Mark Egan

    Mark Egan Active Member

    Josh

    What types of material was used for the customised devices?
    What was a common modification used for the treatment of cavus foot pain?

    My usual regime for those stiff painful cavus feet is using EVA usually 350 with minimal heel modification, and minimal medial and lateral arch fill.
     
  6. Josh Burns

    Josh Burns Active Member

    Mark,
    The full details of the rationale and materials used to fabricate the orthotic device are in the paper. In brief:
    * Neutral suspension plater cast
    * 20% medial soft-tissue arch expansion
    * 3mm polypropylene shell (CADCAM produced)
    * F/ft width - lateral border of foot to bisection of 1st MPJ
    * Length at distal edge was proximal to MPJ's
    * Lateral half-only extrinsic heel post
    * 12mm heel cup height
    * Full length 3mm Poron top cover
    * 6mm lateral heel expansion (mainly due to the thickness of the poron)

    Kind regards
    Josh
     
  7. gold

    gold Member

    Mark
    eva 350. Thats a pretty hard device for for a rigid cavus foot isn't it? I would have thought that a 350 eva device would have even less 'give'(for want of a better word) than say a 4mm polypropylene device. I find that eva 270 with extra lateral arch support works really well. Amfit devices seem to capture the cavus foot effectively.
     
  8. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Predicting Outcomes in the Orthotic Management of Painful, Idiopathic Pes Cavus.
    Crosbie J, Burns J.
    Clin J Sport Med. 2007 Sep;17(5):337-342.
     
  9. bfox@atp-usa.com

    bfox@atp-usa.com Welcome New Poster

  10. Josh Burns

    Josh Burns Active Member

    Dear bfox@atp-usa.com,
    From my orginal paper "For the control group, casts were made of both feet using the same technique as for the treatment group. However, they were not used to fabricate the intervention. Instead the control group were given ‘sham’ insoles made simply from flat, non supportive 3-mm latex foam, a material shown to be the least effective at reducing pressure".

    Topcover was Kashmeer® and bottom cover was Agotex®.

    Kind regards

    Joshua
     
  11. bfox@atp-usa.com

    bfox@atp-usa.com Welcome New Poster

    Joshua,
    Have you done any studies using what have become known as "Pre-Engineered" Orthotics? These are not your typical"Dr Scholls"over the counter, 3-dimensional insoles. These are well designed, accomodative insoles with both arch and metatarsal support molded in. These are currently being used by footcare providers as a first step intervention before going to a true custom orthotic. Would appreciate your comments. Bob
     
  12. Josh Burns

    Josh Burns Active Member

    Hello Bob,
    Not exactly sure what you mean by "Pre-Engineered" Orthotics, but if you are referring to the type you sell (http://www.prothotics.com/contact.htm), no I have not performed any studies on this type.
    Kind regards
    Joshua
     
  13. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Interventions for the prevention and treatment of pes cavus.
    Burns J, Landorf K, Ryan M, Crosbie J, Ouvrier R.
    Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2007 Oct 17;(4):CD006154.
     
  14. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
  15. Josh:

    Congratulations on a job well done. You and your colleagues should be proud of the exciting and ground breaking research of yours that has recently been published on the cavus foot. Your work deeply satisfies me and gives me renewed hope for the continued excellence of podiatric research in both the near and distant future. Your clinically relevant research should also serve as an inspiration to all podiatric researchers around this small world of ours. Please continue with your most valuable research.

     
  16. Josh Burns

    Josh Burns Active Member

    Thank you Kevin for your support and kind words. My colleagues and I are thrilled to win the 2007 JAPMA Stickel Award. I would also like to sincerely thank the funding bodies supporting this research: Prescription Foot Orthotic Laboratory Association (PFOLA), Australian Podiatry Education and Research Foundation (APERF) and NSW Podiatrists Registration Board without which high quality podiatry-relevant clinical trials would not be possible.

    Kindest regards

    Josh


    Joshua Burns PhD, B App Sc (Pod) Hons

    Podiatrist & NHMRC Australian Clinical Research Fellow
    Institute for Neuromuscular Research, The Children's Hospital at Westmead
    Discipline of Paediatrics and Child Health, Faculty of Medicine, The University of Sydney, Australia
    Email: joshuab2@chw.edu.au
     
  17. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Acute effect of orthoses on foot orientation and perceived comfort in individuals with pes cavus during standing
    Mansour Eslami, Clarice Tanak, Sébastien Hinse, Mehrdad Anbarian and Paul Allard
    The Foot Volume 19, Issue 1, March 2009, Pages 1-6
     
  18. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Dynamic plantar loading index: Understanding the benefit of custom foot orthoses for painful pes cavus
    Bijan Najafi, Elizabeth Barnica, James S. Wrobel, Joshua Burns
    Journal of Biomechanics; Available online 17 April 2012
     
  19. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Mechanism of effective orthotic therapy for the painful cavus foot
    Bijan Najafi, James Wrobel and Joshua Burns
    Journal of Foot and Ankle Research 2013, 6(Suppl 1):O3 doi:10.1186/1757-1146-6-S1-O3
     
  20. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Comparison of plantar pressures and contact area between normal and cavus foot
    Fernández-Seguín Lourdes Ma, Diaz Mancha Juan Antonioa, Sánchez Rodríguez Raquela, Escamilla Martínez Elenaa, Gómez Martín Beatriza, Ramos Ortega Javier
    Gait & Posture; Available online 28 October 2013
     
  21. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Biomechanical analysis of the custom made
    insoles on gait of pes cavus patients

    Jungkyu Choi et al
    INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BIOLOGY AND BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING Issue 3, Volume 7, 2013
     
  22. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Mechanism of orthotic therapy for the painful cavus foot deformity
    Bijan Najafi, James S Wrobel and Joshua Burns
    Journal of Foot and Ankle Research 2014, 7:2 doi:10.1186/1757-1146-7-2
     
  23. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Effects of custom-made insoles on idiopathic
    pes cavus foot during walking

    Jung-Kyu Choi et al
    Bio-Medical Materials and Engineering 26 (2015) S705–S715
     
  24. pgcarter

    pgcarter Well-Known Member

    I have used a neutral cast with a 5mm layer of 270 density eva for the top and then under fill using red slow return poron.....really absorbing and enhances stopping distance and stopping time on landing....great for fused ankles, stj.'s enhances loss of motion and poor shock absorption scenarios. no research but great clinical results. Only last about 1 to 2 yrs but quick and cheap to make another pr off existing mold.
     
  25. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Effects of custom-made insoles on idiopathic pes cavus foot during walking.
    Choi JK et al
    Biomed Mater Eng. 2015;26 Suppl 1:S705-15
     
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