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Henoch-schonlein purpura and foot pain in child

Discussion in 'Pediatrics' started by timharmey, Apr 29, 2013.

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  1. timharmey

    timharmey Active Member


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    My wifes niece ( 8) developed painful feet went to doc and was diagnosed with the above an auto-immune disease have to admit it was a new one on me, worth being aware of methinks
     
  2. Craig Payne

    Craig Payne Moderator

    Articles:
    6
    Re: Henoch-schonlein purpura

    This is from the notes that I used to give students:
     
  3. Admin2

    Admin2 Administrator Staff Member

    Henoch–Schönlein purpura

    Henoch–Schönlein purpura (HSP) is a disease of the skin, mucous membranes, and sometimes other organs that most commonly affects children. In the skin, the disease causes palpable purpura (small, raised areas of bleeding underneath the skin), often with joint pain and abdominal pain. With kidney involvement, there may be a loss of small amounts of blood and protein in the urine (hematuria and proteinuria), but this usually goes unnoticed; in a small proportion of cases, the kidney involvement proceeds to chronic kidney disease. HSP is often preceded by an infection, such as a throat infection.

    HSP is a systemic vasculitis (inflammation of blood vessels) and is characterized by deposition of immune complexes containing the antibody immunoglobulin A (IgA); the exact cause for this phenomenon is unknown. In children, it usually resolves within several weeks and requires no treatment apart from symptom control but may relapse in a third of cases and cause irreversible kidney damage in about one in a hundred cases. In adults, the prognosis is different from in children. The average duration of cutaneous lesions is 27.9 months.[3] For many, it tends to be relapsing–remitting over a long period of time, rather than self-limiting and there tend to be more complications.[4]

    1. ^ J. C. Jennette; R. J. Falk; P. A. Bacon; et al. (January 2013). "2012 Revised International Chapel Hill Consensus Conference Nomenclature of Vasculitides". Arthritis & Rheumatism. 65 (1): 1–11. doi:10.1002/art.37715. PMID 23045170.
    2. ^ a b c Rapini RP, Bolognia JL, Jorizzo JL (2007). Dermatology. St. Louis: Mosby. ISBN 978-1-4160-2999-1.
    3. ^ Sais G, Vidaller A, Jucglà A, Servitje O, Condom E, Peyri J (1998). "Prognostic factors in leukocytoclastic vasculitis: a clinicopathologic study of 160 patients". Dermatol. 134 (3): 309–15. PMID 9521029.
    4. ^ "Treatment Challenges, Uncertainty Abound with IgA Vasculitis". The Rheumatologist. 2016.
     

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