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Morbid obesity and lower limb problems

Discussion in 'General Issues and Discussion Forum' started by NewsBot, Feb 26, 2008.

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  1. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Potential Contributions of Skeletal Muscle Contractile Dysfunction to Altered Biomechanics in Obesity
    Lance M. Bollinger et al
    Gait and Posture; Article in Press
     
  2. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Foot pain severity is associated with the ratio of visceral to subcutaneous fat mass, fat-mass index and depression in women.
    Walsh TP et al
    Rheumatol Int. 2017 May 17. doi: 10.1007/s00296-017-3743-0.
     
  3. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Increased calf and plantar muscle fibrotic contents in obese subjects may cause ankle instability.
    Zhu J et al
    Biosci Rep. 2016 Aug 16;36(4). pii: e00368. doi: 10.1042/BSR20160206.
     
  4. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Does Weight Reduction Affect Foot Structure and the Strength of the Muscles That Move the Ankle in Obese Japanese Adults?
    Xiaoguang Zhao, et al
    JFAS; Article in Press
     
  5. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    The effects of body weight unloading on kinetics and muscle activity of overweight males during Overground walking
    Arielle G. Fischer et al
    Clinical Biomechanics; Article in Press
     
  6. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Press Release:
    81 Percent of Obese Americans Experience Foot Pain
    New Survey Finds Obese Americans are Significantly More Likely to Experience Many Foot Ailments

    WASHINGTON, April 2, 2018 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- An astounding 81 percent of obese Americans say they suffer from foot pain and at times experience multiple foot and ankle conditions, according to a recent survey by the American Podiatric Medical Association (APMA). This finding, coupled with the soaring rates of US obesity, makes visiting a podiatrist to address foot pain critically important.

    The study surveyed 1,275 US adults, ages 18 and older, to gain information about how many overweight and obese Americans experience foot pain. Results showed that not only do obese Americans have foot pain issues, but so do overweight Americans. In fact, 74 percent of overweight Americans say they experience foot problems. As foot pain contributes to a variety of negative health consequences, it is important that Americans seek the care of a podiatrist immediately if problems arise.

    APMA member podiatrists have specialized medical training and unique qualifications in treating the foot and ankle.

    "Podiatrists are physicians, surgeons and specialists who treat diseases, injuries, and deformities of the foot and ankle," said APMA President Dennis R. Frisch, DPM. "This includes diagnosing the cause and treating foot pain, which can really restrict activity."

    It is critical that people pay attention to their feet and seek expert treatment for foot problems. A podiatrist can not only help Americans get active, but also help catch signs of diabetes, arthritis, and nerve and circulatory disorders, which can all be detected in the feet.

    APMA's "Today's Podiatrist" campaign, occurring during April's Foot Health Awareness Month, will share important information about the link between weight and foot pain, foot issues different generations face, and more. To learn about the campaign, and to find a podiatrist in your area, visit www.apma.org/todayspodiatrist.

    The American Podiatric Medical Association (APMA) is the nation's leading professional organization for today's podiatrists. Doctors of Podiatric Medicine (DPMs) are qualified by their education, training, and experience to diagnose and treat conditions affecting the foot, ankle, and structures of the leg. APMA has 53 state component locations across the United States and its territories, with a membership of more than 12,000 podiatrists. All practicing APMA members are licensed by the state in which they practice podiatric medicine. For more information, visit www.apma.org.
     
  7. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Quadriceps Impairment is Associated with Gait Mechanics in Young Adults with Obesity
    Vakula, Michael et al
    Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise: January 8, 2019 - Volume Publish Ahead of Print - Issue - p
     
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