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New practice co-locating in GP clinic questions

Discussion in 'Practice Management' started by fixedgearmama, Aug 12, 2016.

  1. fixedgearmama

    fixedgearmama Member


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    HI All,

    I am starting my own practice (at last - yippeee!) and am meeting to discuss the possibility of co-locating with some GPs. The practice manager suggested that a percentage payment for the room would be what they would like to do. I understand this would include reception but yet to discuss %amount and what it would include absolutely.

    Can anyone suggest what is a good % and for what services? When I meet what should I be asking for?

    I know these are broad questions and I have an idea about what I want to discuss with them but just want to make sure I dont miss anything :)

    I cant finish my business plan until I have this side of it sorted out!:dizzy:

    Thanks in advance...
     
  2. davidh

    davidh Podiatry Arena Veteran

    I can give you a little advice based on my own experiences over the years.

    Sharing your profits is not a bad way to go for you initially, and I would suggest a 30/70% split, with you taking 70%. You are, after all, providing all the equipment and consumables.

    The GP Practice manager will probably tell you that the GPs will refer patients to you.
    Hmmmm :pigs: , not in my experience. They may well ask for free advice while you are on-site, but that's not the same as referring patients to you.
    Be aware that reception staff are unlikely to look upon you favourably. You are extra work as far as they are concerned, private to boot (which they may have problems with).

    If you can negotiate a contract for diabetic foot checks so much the better. Probably unlikely though, since they can have their practice nurses do these for nothing.

    Don't accept promises - get everything in writing - its a good place to start.
     
  3. fishpod

    fishpod Well-Known Member

    i do this in 3 gp practices its amazing i have done it for 22 years my appt diary is bursting full for 10 weeks yesterday 28 pts no dnas. i get loads of referrals from gp practice nurses advanced nurse practitioners.i do do some freebees as for rent 2 are free . One i pay 50 pounds a session. for this i get building couch couch roll tea coffee secretary 10 receptionists 20 referrers photocopier computer records to much to mention. its agreat way to practice as you gan get the gps to look at your patients as well its a 2 way street. good luck 20 percent is probably a figure to aim for.
     
  4. fishpod

    fishpod Well-Known Member

    i do this in 3 gp practices its amazing i have done it for 22 years my appt diary is bursting full for 10 weeks yesterday 28 pts no dnas. i get loads of referrals from gp practice nurses advanced nurse practitioners.i do do some freebees as for rent 2 are free . One i pay 50 pounds a session. for this i get building couch couch roll tea coffee secretary 10 receptionists 20 referrers photocopier computer records to much to mention. its agreat way to practice as you gan get the gps to look at your patients as well its a 2 way street. good luck 20 percent is probably a figure to aim for.
     
  5. davidh

    davidh Podiatry Arena Veteran

    I suspect this is the exception, rather than the rule.

    I have had experiences of two GP practices, one in Birmingham, one in Sunderland. They were both less than enthusuastic at having a podiatrist around the place. In each case the Practice Manager made claims which she could not carry through.

    It's a good place to start though, provided you go in with your eyes open, and don't buy into all the promises.
     
  6. Heather J Bassett

    Heather J Bassett Well-Known Member

    Congratulations on starting your own biz.

    An exit strategy is one of the most important things to consider. How do you leave? Are the clients yours? Or do they belong to the clinic? What happens if you put time and energy in and they are not happy and ask you to leave. I have seen this happen and it is devastating.

    Are you in the smallest room down the very back?

    David makes some good points.

    Do you control what you can charge? How much room do you have for products and extra services, room for gait assessments, is there an area to set up a lab to adjust orthoses?

    Or is there room only to be a toenail cutter?

    It is important that you get everything in writing, thank them for the offers and then advise you will be discussing the offer with your mentors and financial advisers (hey that maybe us here, they don't need to know that ;)) and will get back to them. Do not feel you have to agree to their terms their and then.

    Fishpond has had a great experience which is fantastic, I don't know of many others.

    It will be a big learning curve what ever choices you make! Our first years in biz are often filled with gifts of reinfections and what we should have or could have done :D

    What do you think about the discussion so far??

    Good luck
     
  7. JonathanH

    JonathanH Member

    Good on you for taking the next step!
    I've also had varied experienced in medical centres - some can be really good, others can be just an experience

    1. consider your level of experience? do you need mentorship for podiatry?
    2. who is billing? and collecting the $? and sorting out your $ as well as the medical centre's $?
    3. what's your marketing strategy?
     
  8. TPCMAN

    TPCMAN Member

    This is a great thread guy!
    At the moment I am working for a practice group on salary. The owner at every team meeting makes sure he lets us pods know that it is risky to go out on your own and that you should be thankful for the security you have in the company. I would like to know what is the current level of demand there is out there for podiatrists, especially in Melbourne. Is simply a matter of approaching a practice manager in a GP clinic and offering your services to them? Or should I remain in the cage? (notice the sentiment...)
     
  9. fixedgearmama

    fixedgearmama Member

    Hi TPCMan. I have found the GP clincs to be quite favourable to allied health. Talk to the practice managers & practice nurses. You will find you get a lot of diabetes foot assessment under EPC so ut is important to remind the doctors what else pods can do. Its all about compromise & flexibility. Research competitors also - overheads are less than a leased clinic so perhaps pay it forward to the client.
     
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