Welcome to the Podiatry Arena forums

You are currently viewing our podiatry forum as a guest which gives you limited access to view all podiatry discussions and access our other features. By joining our free global community of Podiatrists and other interested foot health care professionals you will have access to post podiatry topics (answer and ask questions), communicate privately with other members, upload content, view attachments, receive a weekly email update of new discussions, access other special features. Registered users do not get displayed the advertisements in posted messages. Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please, join our global Podiatry community today!

  1. Everything that you are ever going to want to know about running shoes: Running Shoes Boot Camp Online, for taking it to the next level? See here for more.
    Dismiss Notice
  2. Have you considered the Critical Thinking and Skeptical Boot Camp, for taking it to the next level? See here for more.
    Dismiss Notice
  3. Have you considered the Clinical Biomechanics Boot Camp Online, for taking it to the next level? See here for more.
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Have you considered the Clinical Biomechanics Boot Camp Online, for taking it to the next level? See here for more.
Dismiss Notice
Have you liked us on Facebook to get our updates? Please do. Click here for our Facebook page.
Dismiss Notice
Do you get the weekly newsletter that Podiatry Arena sends out to update everybody? If not, click here to organise this.

Orthopedic footwear for people with degenerative foot disorders

Discussion in 'Gerontology' started by Hylton Menz, Apr 8, 2005.

  1. Hylton Menz

    Hylton Menz Guest


    Members do not see these Ads. Sign Up.
    From the latest Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation:

    Jannink MJ, IJzerman MJ, Groothuis-Oudshoorn K, Stewart RE, Groothoff JW, Lankhorst GJ. Use of orthopedic shoes in patients with degenerative disorders of the foot. Arch Phys Med Rehabil 2005;86:687–92.

    Objectives To study the actual use of orthopedic shoes by patients with degenerative foot disorders and to identify factors associated with use and nonuse, based on the parameters of the International Organization for Standardization definition of usability: effectiveness, efficiency, satisfaction, and context of use. Design Multicenter, prospective cohort study. Setting Outpatient clinics of 7 rehabilitation centers in the Netherlands. Participants One hundred consecutive patients with degenerative foot disorders. Interventions Not applicable. Main outcome measures Usability was assessed by means of the Questionnaire for Usability Evaluation of orthopedic shoes. Results Seventy of 93 patients with degenerative foot disorders wore their orthopedic shoes for more than 3 days a week after 3 months of follow-up. Factors significantly associated with the actual use of orthopedic shoes were (1) increase in stance duration (effectiveness odds ratio [OR]=2.14; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.19–3.85), (2) decrease in skin abnormalities (effectiveness OR=1.35; 95% CI, 1.02–1.8]), (3) problems experienced with putting on and taking off orthopedic shoes (efficiency OR=.46; 95% CI, .26–.82), and (4) cosmetic appearance of orthopedic shoes (satisfaction OR=1.54; 95% CI, 1.1–2.15). The overall fit of the multiple logistic regression model (R2) was 56.3%. Conclusions By adding efficiency and satisfaction factors and not focusing only on the effectiveness factors, the amount of explained variance increases, and it becomes possible to evaluate and design products for people with special needs more comprehensively.

    Cheers,

    Hylton
     
Loading...

Share This Page