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Overuse Injuries Associated with Mountain Biking

Discussion in 'Biomechanics, Sports and Foot orthoses' started by NewsBot, Jan 7, 2014.

  1. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1

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    Overuse Injuries Associated with Mountain Biking: Is Single-Speed Riding a Predisposing Factor?
    Michael T. Lebec, Kortny Cook and Drew Baumgartel
    Sports 2014, 2(1), 1-13;
     
  2. I don't understand why single speed mountain bikes would be advantageous other than a slight savings in bike weight. Is single speed mountain biking becoming popular? Why?
     
  3. Phil3600

    Phil3600 Active Member

    I think the belief is that riding single speed you get more of a workout so it gives a fitness benefit. I can only speak from the riders I know who do it and it tends to be roadies who also ride offroad. You can usually spot a single speed rider because they are out of the saddle early even on minor gradients so there might be a fitness advantage there (I suppose you would need to measure Watts, HR etc to really make a comparison). However, on the monster technical climbs a single speed bike will not make it up, even with the fitter riders, and I believe these climbs are where you get the biggest fitness and handling gains from mountain biking to convert to the road. This is just my experience. There will be a reduction in maintenance with single speed too. Personally I like my gears.
     
  4. efuller

    efuller MVP

    When I used to bike commute to San Francisco I would ride the shuttle with bike messangers. There was sort of a cool factor with single fixed speeds. It's minimalist biking. :dizzy: Most of the messengers would make fun of the messenger who complaining about sore knees after riding the single speed.

    Eric
     
  5. N.Knight

    N.Knight Active Member

    Hi All,

    It is part a fitness point of view and challange really, riding up a steep hill is very difficult on a single speed, however they all have knee pain, quads the size the moutains but horrible knee pain.

    Also they like the policy less on the bike, less that can go wrong and fix.

    I use a single speed for 10 mile road rides, quick easy hassle free, I would never dream of mtb biking on it.
     
  6. Phil3600

    Phil3600 Active Member

  7. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Effect of Wheel Diameter on Mountain Bike Impact Forces
    Brent Alumbaugh, Morris Levy, Samuel E. S. Phillips, Graeme E. Smith, Gerald A. Smith, FACSM.
    ACSM Meeting May 2014
     
  8. Craig Payne

    Craig Payne Moderator

    Articles:
    6
    I emailed this to a friend and got this response:
     
  9. plevanszx1

    plevanszx1 Active Member

    i confess this is far from my field of expertise but i seem to recall the wisdom that the seat should be properly adjusted for leg length ,that is, with a slight extension when pedal fully down at 6o'clock. If this is not done on a long term basis there is a possibility of hamstring shortening and injury . anybody out there able to confirm
     
  10. efuller

    efuller MVP

    I hear that it is more of a question of efficiency rather than injury. I don't think that you are going to get inured if your seat is 1/4" too low.

    The quick and dirty seat measurement that I heard was sitting with your pelvis level on the seat, place your heel on the pedal and at bottom dead center (6 o'clock) the seat height should be set to allow the knee to be fully extended. So, when the forefoot is on the pedal the ankle plantar flexion will allow a small amount of flexion in the knee at bottom dead center. This measurement works well for me.

    Eric
     
  11. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Changes in foot posture after sport in male mountain bikers: Pilot study
    Ana Pelaez Menacho et al
    Revista Espanola de Podologia; Vol. 27. Num. 01. Enero - Junio 2016
     
  12. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Mountain Biking Injuries
    Ansari, Majid MD1; Nourian, Ruhollah MD1; Khodaee, Morteza MD, MPH, FACSM2
    Current Sports Medicine Reports: November/December 2017 - Volume 16 - Issue 6 - p 404–412
     
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