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Proximal influences in medial tibial stress syndrome

Discussion in 'Biomechanics, Sports and Foot orthoses' started by NewsBot, Aug 21, 2012.

  1. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1

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    LOWER EXTREMITY KINEMATICS IN RUNNING ATHLETES WITH AND WITHOUT A HISTORY OF MEDIAL SHIN PAIN
    Janice K. Loudon and Michael P. Reiman
    Int J Sports Phys Ther. 2012 August; 7(4): 356–364.
    Full text
     
  2. Admin2

    Admin2 Administrator Staff Member

  3. drsha

    drsha Banned

    OK, so we have internally placed hips and flexed knees reflecting a collapse in the corresponding closed chain feet either in the rearfoot/the forefoot/or both.

    Do we treat the feet, the posture or both?
    and can we discuss how we accomplish that?

    Dennis
     
  4. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    The role of hip abductor and external rotator muscle strength in the development of exertional medial tibial pain: a prospective study
    Ruth Verrelst, Tine Marieke Willems, Dirk De Clercq, Philip Roosen, Lennert Goossens, Erik Witvrouw
    Br J Sports Med doi:10.1136/bjsports-2012-091710
     
  5. drsha

    drsha Banned

    OK, so we have internally placed hips (due to hip abductor weakness this time?) and flexed knees reflecting a collapse in the corresponding closed chain feet either in the rearfoot/the forefoot/or both.

    Do we treat the feet, the posture or both?
    and can we discuss how we accomplish that?

    Dennis
     
  6. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Hip Muscle Weakness As A Risk Factor For The Development Of Exertional Medial Tibial Pain: A Prospective Study
    Ruth Verrelst, Tine Willems, Dirk De Clercq, Philip Roosen,
    Presented at 2013 ACSM Mtg
     
  7. drsha

    drsha Banned

    Once again, if this proximal factor should be investigated and screened for, what treatment do you recommend once it is discovered to exist?

    Dennis
     
  8. Griff

    Griff Moderator

    Dennis - if hip abductor weakness is shown to be a risk factor for a given pathology, and hip abductor weakness is 'discovered to exist' then what treatment do you think would be recommended??
     
  9. drsha

    drsha Banned

    Is there anyone else who didn't understand that I was asking for treatments for hip abductor weakness?

    Dennis
     
  10. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    The role of proximal dynamic joint stability in the development of exertional medial tibial pain: a prospective study
    Ruth Verrelst, Dirk De Clercq, Jos Vanrenterghem, Tine Willems, Tanneke Palmans, Erik Witvrouw
    Br J Sports Med doi:10.1136/bjsports-2012-092126
     
  11. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Contralateral Risk Factors Associated with Exertional Medial Tibial Pain in Women
    Verrelst, Ruth; De Clercq, Dirk; Willems, Tine M.; Roosen, Philip; Witrouw, Erik
    Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise: 10 February 2014
     
  12. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Differences between hip abductor and adductor strength and medial tibial stress syndrome in collegiate distance runners
    Soria, Alex, M.S.,
    CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, FULLERTON, 2014, 36 pages; 1525738
     
  13. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Hip Abductor and Adductor Strength and Medial Tibial Stress Syndrome in Collegiate Distance Runners.
    Alex Soria, Jared W. Coburn, FACSM, Lee E. Brown, FACSM, Robert Kersey.
    Presented at the ACSM Meeting; San Diego May 2015
     
  14. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    BIOMECHANICAL FACTORS ASSOCIATED WITH MEDIAL TIBIAL STRESS SYNDROME: A
    PROSPECTIVE STUDY

     
  15. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    ALTERED SAGITTAL PLANE HIP BIOMECHANICS IN ADOLESCENT MALE DISTANCE RUNNERS WITH A HISTORY OF LOWER EXTREMITY INJURY.
    Lachniet PB et al
    Int J Sports Phys Ther. 2018 Jun;13(3):441-452.
     
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