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Psychogenic limp in a child

Discussion in 'Pediatrics' started by NewsBot, Mar 4, 2014.

  1. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
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    Psychogenic limp in a child: are we aware of it?
    Tripathy SK1, Mishra BR, Mishra S, Mohapatra D.
    J Pediatr Orthop B. 2014 Feb 27.
     
  2. wdd

    wdd Well-Known Member

    So psychogenic limp exists in children. Is that a suprise?

    I wonder what percentage of cases are psychological in origin?

    No matter what the actual answer is I am sure that the perceived percentage of psychogenic cases is going to go up dramatically following this article.

    Back to my original question I would guess that a psychological cause exists in less than 1%, probably nearer 0.1% or less but lets say that in fact 10% of cases of childhood limp are psychogenic.

    If 10% of children presenting with any condition were presenting with something psychogenic in origin would it be a reasonable starting point to send them off to see a psychiatrist?

    A nice way for a busy GP to clear his list. "Before I do anything I think we'll send you along to see the psychiatrist".

    I don't think so.

    Bill
     
  3. DrBob

    DrBob Active Member

    Many years ago I did voluntary work at a special school because I was friends with the Physios and OTs. One weekend we had taken a group of disabled children away and one physio had her own, normal daughter, who was abot three or four if I remember correctly. During the weekend, the physio asked me if I would check her daughter over because she had developed a limp. I said I'd be most happy to look. I watched the child through the weekend then called the physio to come and have a look. When the little girl was with the disabled children she would stop and watch, then start to copy their their movement patterns. It happened every time the children were together. We did nothing but have a chuckle, the physio slept well, and as far as I know, the little girl grew up quite normally...
     
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