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Reduced vertical impact loading in female runners with medically diagnosed injuries

Discussion in 'Biomechanics, Sports and Foot orthoses' started by NewsBot, Dec 8, 2015.

  1. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1

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    Reduced vertical impact loading in female runners with medically diagnosed injuries: a prospective investigation
    Irene S Davis, Bradley J Bowser, David R Mullineauz
    Br J Sports Med doi:10.1136/bjsports-2015-094579
     
  2. Craig Payne

    Craig Payne Moderator

    Articles:
    6
    Odd.
    Title says one thing and results say another thing.
    Conclusions makes no sense.

    I pinged the editor for clairfication
     
  3. Craig Payne

    Craig Payne Moderator

    Articles:
    6
    Here is title from paper
    here is the first paragraph from discussion:
    Am I stupidly missing something or is the title saying the opposite of what the results say?
     
  4. Craig Payne

    Craig Payne Moderator

    Articles:
    6
    I not stupid after all. The authors are trying to get the title corrected.
     
  5. Ian Drakard

    Ian Drakard Active Member

    I have a problem as soon as you get to the background section. "Running has been critical to human survival. Therefore, the high rate of injuries experienced by modern day runners is puzzling."

    The implication being that the inury rate of modern humans is higher than our ancestors. If anyone can tell me what the injury rate was for our ancestors was I'd like to know. You know those recreational road running ancestors. I'm not even sure that the injury rates in runners is universally acknowleged as 'high' relative to what by nature is an activity of repetitive stress.
     

  6. added to that the 1000?s years where only the sports stars and kids ran, people walked or road horses and carts etc etc

    The running revolution was late 70s early 80s not very long ago
     
  7. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Do runners who suffer injuries have higher vertical ground reaction forces than those who remain injury-free? A systematic review and meta-analysis
    Henk van der Worp, Jelte W Vrielink, Steef W Bredeweg
    Br J Sports Med doi:10.1136/bjsports-2015-094924
     
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