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Rocker sandal

Discussion in 'Biomechanics, Sports and Foot orthoses' started by David Smith, Sep 5, 2014.

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  1. David Smith

    David Smith Well-Known Member


    Members do not see these Ads. Sign Up.
    Today I have mostly been making a Rocker sandal for a lady with a large LLD going on hols - she walked very well in it. Then she said can I go climbing up hills and rocks and things in it? NO! you'll most likely sprain your ankle and if your climbing you're short leg wont matter anyway.


    [​IMG]


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  2. efuller

    efuller MVP

    People with legs of equal length are more likely to sprain their ankle when climbing up hills and over rocks. She should do it if she's willing to take the risk. Live!

    Eric
     
  3. David Smith

    David Smith Well-Known Member

    I agree but you mis interpreted what I meant, I meant that it would be more perilous to wear the sandal in terms of increased STJ moments when climbing.
    :dizzy:
     
  4. efuller

    efuller MVP

    Now you got me to thinking about the effect of the rocker on the location of center of pressure. I'm not so sure that it would dramatically change STJ moments. The rocker will tend to affect the Ant-post disposition of the center of pressure more than the medial to lateral position. The weight stays on the heel longer in a typical rocker shoe and therefore the center of pressure under the foot will progress forward slower when using the rocker. True, because of the angulation of the STJ axis away from the sagittal plane, this will tend to put a slightly smaller pronation moment from the ground later in stance and toward heel off. However, for most feet this would be relatively small.

    Eric
     
  5. Boots n all

    Boots n all Well-Known Member

    See l read that as the sandal was the issue for climbing? And agree,
    A short boot would be more suitable, but the additional thickness to the sole for the rocker will make it very hard to climb, as the sole wont twist or flex to give better grip to the changing surfaces of the rocks.
     
  6. efuller

    efuller MVP

    I don't see the problem as lack of twist or flex. A fair number of hiking boots will twist or flex about as much as the rocks that you are scrambling over. The difficulty of that sandal, in the picture, is the small amount of sole in contact with the ground. There is very little area on which to balance while stranding with the foot level. This is much less of a problem while moving.

    In stance, with no muscles active, the center of pressure will be close to the intersection of the ankle and subtalar joint. When the center of pressure is at that point, for the sandal in that picture, the shoe will rock backwards. Most people stand with a little tension in their Achilles, so most people might be ok with that much posterior rocker.

    Eric
     
  7. Glen Willey

    Glen Willey Member

    A sandal of any persuasion is not appropriate for walking or climbing over rocks and uneven surfaces irrespective whether LLD is present or not. Many surefooted individuals in sandals have met an unfortunate event on bush walks over the years and will possibly continue to do so.
    Suggest suitable footwear 1st.
    Glen
     
  8. efuller

    efuller MVP

    Most of my comments in this thread have been about the reason(s) why we would make a choice of one shoe over another or whether to partake in an activity. Yes, if you were going to hike off trail in sandals, you would be much more likely to have a stick poke your foot. However, I'm a canoeist, and waterproof sandals with good straps and a non slip outersole are probably the best choice for carrying a canoe over rocks and putting the canoe back in the water. (Although, sunburn is an issue.) I believe the Teva sandal company was started by a former river guide. If we are going to give advice we should have solid reasoning behind that advice.

    Eric
     
  9. horseman

    horseman Active Member

    As a mountaineer I use approach sandals to walk in to huts etc as they are quick drying, light and can be worn in mountain huts. :D Of all my injuries over the years, and there are several, none has ever been caused by my footwear.
    On the other hand I have tripped over my shoelace entering my surgery.:boohoo:
    Lucky for me, no patients present.
     
  10. Glen Willey

    Glen Willey Member

    Accept my apology for my ignorance as I am only a designer of footwear and any relationship the footwear have for the individual's use is rarely taken into consideration.
    However ,the sandal in question (photo) would appear not to be my choice of sandal design to be "walking over rocks" as was the original question to the author of the quote..
    Regards
    Glen
     
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