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Routine podiatry in the NHS

Discussion in 'United Kingdom' started by tonywatson12, Feb 2, 2014.

  1. tonywatson12

    tonywatson12 Active Member


    Members do not see these Ads. Sign Up.
    why are patients given a standard 3-4 month routine podiatry return in the NHS when most patients feel this is to long and leaves them sometimes in pain.

    Even if the podiatrist wants to the system usually won't allow patients to have routine care at 8 weeks which seems to me to be the optimum time for this type of care

    would love to hear your opinions about this
     
  2. Tuckersm

    Tuckersm Well-Known Member

    Supply and demand in a capped system.

    From what i understand, the NHS, like most publicly funded systems has a limited bucket of money, and therefore a limited number of podiatrists providing a limited number of consultations. If you half the return period and keep the consult length the same you either need to double the staff (impossible with no extra $) or half the patients serviced (possible if you limit the types of services that are provided)
     
  3. dazzalyn1

    dazzalyn1 Member

    Where I live in the East Midlands NHS pod patients aren't given an appointment (except for ulcers/wound healing), they are asked to 'ring in' in twelve weeks and then given an appointment taking the time often to 14 or 16wks. I see quite a few private patients who book between their NHS treatments because they are in pain, affecting mobility/quality of life.
     
  4. Geoff Hull Footman

    Geoff Hull Footman Active Member

    Yes we all have people like this but where does responsibility rest if something goes wrong ?.Is there conflict of interest?.Whose insurance is going to pay damages if fault is found, private insurance or NHS?.Also looking at ftp hearings some have been in trouble regarding this haven't they?.You don't have 2 dentists Gp's etc.
     
  5. tonywatson12

    tonywatson12 Active Member

    do we do limited work on the majority in the nhs
    and extensive work on the minority in the private sector?

    I always will support the nhs as fantastic organisation but are we still after all these years just doing the "cut and come back" style of podiatry in the 15 - 20 min pressured time slots?
     
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