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Sal acid

Discussion in 'United Kingdom' started by rosepod1, Jul 23, 2018.

  1. rosepod1

    rosepod1 Guest


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    looking for some general advice concerning sal acid 60%
    The clinic I work in operates verruca treatment on basis of 60% sal acid with masking and offloading with the patient removing this at home after 2 days and continuing with daily scholl plasters (40% sal acid) and review every 4 weeks for debridement and repeat. General rule of thumb is to do this for 6 months unless we think resolution has happened in which case we cease treatment, let the site dry out and review.
    Just wondering what other clinics do when using sal acid in clinic and what your thoughts are regarding this method.
    In my training we didn’t use sal acid much and NICE guidelines dont specify on the higher % so I’m looking for some guidance from experienced pods.
    Thanks in advance
     
  2. Catfoot

    Catfoot Well-Known Member

    Hi rosepod1,
    You said that in training "we didn't use sal acid much", so what were you actually taught about using it?
     
  3. Catfoot

    Catfoot Well-Known Member

    I see you haven't returned, Rosepod.

    The problem we have (which is probably why there is a dearth of responses) is that no-one can advise you when we don't know what you know/don't know about this modality.

    All I can say is that if you aren't confident about this treatment, then either 1.Arrange for some more clinical experience (shadowing etc) or 2. Just don't use it.
     
  4. Mark_M

    Mark_M Active Member

    Hi rosepod1,
    I used to use a similar method.
    1. debride
    2. apply 60% sal acid under occlusion 3 days
    3. pt returns in 1 week - repeat step 1 & 2

    I would find on average wart would resolve 4-6 weeks.
    I practice in a beach side suburb my patients dont like keeping there foot dry for 3/7 days.
    Now I use Potassium Hydroxide flakes
     
  5. Catfoot

    Catfoot Well-Known Member

    MarM,
    I have never heard of using KOH flakes as a treatment for VP. Where were you taught this?
     
  6. Mark_M

    Mark_M Active Member

    Hi Catfoot,
    Im in Australia. I was taught to use Salacid or Trichloracetic/ monochloracetic acid.
    A few years ago Trichloracetic acid became a schedule 4 medicine, so general podiatrists were no longer able to use this.
    As a replacement KOH was recommended by my medical supplier.
    No training was provided, lucky there is this great site called Podiatry Arena to get advice on such matters.
     
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