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The theory of myofascial pain syndromes caused by trigger points has been refuted

Discussion in 'General Issues and Discussion Forum' started by NewsBot, Dec 5, 2014.

  1. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

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    A critical evaluation of the trigger point phenomenon
    John L. Quintner, Geoffrey M. Bove and Milton L. Cohen
    Rheumatology (2014); First published online
     
  2. Admin2

    Admin2 Administrator Staff Member

  3. Fits with my thinking on this, see this thread from a couple of years ago: http://www.podiatry-arena.com/podiatry-forum/showthread.php?t=74362&page=3

    I said:

    Seems I may have been right to be skeptical.
     
  4. Ian Linane

    Ian Linane Well-Known Member

    Funny. I saw this earlier today and thought of you having a smile.
     
  5. Anyone for a dry needling course? :dizzy:

    Applied kinesiology courses going cheap also.

    Charlatans. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0RJwW77Lsj8 "everyone has been burned before"

    "It seemed so plausable" "well how ****in scientific, I didn't realise you'd gone to so much trouble"- Hicks. The trouble is, they hadn't gone to any trouble at all, merely jumped upon the bandwagon and hoped for the best (and the money). Tossers, kill yourself. "There is no rationalization for what you do..."; "sleep tight"- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gDW_Hj2K0wo
     
  6. Griff

    Griff Moderator

  7. musmed

    musmed Active Member

    Dear Simon
    Note they did not say they don't exist.
    Prof Cohen has been an anti TP person for 30+ years that i know of.

    just because we cannot understand what is going on, it does not mean these phenomena do not exist.

    let me know when you work this out:
    why at moon rise it looks so big
    yet if you take a photo it is small as when moon rise has finished rising.

    did you see it did you not?

    buckets of rain for the past week. they say a week more of rain and severe thunder storms and hail, flash flooding etc.
    it is the silly season

    took photos of a pair of common emerald doves. they are 2000 miles out of wack. Their GPS has failed!!
    they should be up far north Queensland and/or Indonesia.

    Regards to all
    Paul Conneely
     
  8. Stanley

    Stanley Well-Known Member


    He doesn't deny the existence of Trigger Points. He denies that Myofascial Pain Syndrome (Fibromyalgia) is caused by Trigger Points. I agree with his findings.
     
  9. Hands up, all those that have actually read the paper?

    I have.:drinks
    The "clinical phenomena" which they do not deny, are that some people have sore spots in their soft tissues.
     
  10. musmed

    musmed Active Member

    Dear Stanley

    There is no way trigger points and fibromyalgia could be the same.
    Myofascial points are just that, they are points that hurt and are non symmetrical.

    fibromyalgia is symmetrical and thus come from above the cerebellum

    one is local one is central.
    still raining ++
    Paul Conneely www.musmed.com.au
    Prof Bogduk said that fibromyalgia is one of the serotoinin linked conditions that is over ridden by oestrogen.
    I think he is right
     
  11. blinda

    blinda MVP

    Have now.

    Needles, having a therapeutic effect? Frankie says; Sounds like witchcraft ;)
     
  12. "We propose that sufficient research has been performed to allow TrP theories to be discarded. The scientific literature shows not only that diagnosis of the pathognomonic feature of MPS (the TrP) is unreliable, but also that treatment directed to the putative TrP elicits a response that is indistinguishable from the placebo effect." :morning:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5klKXoGrReM
     
  13. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

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  14. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

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    A Critical Evaluation of Quintner et al: Missing the Point
    Jan Dommerholt, PT, DPT, MPS, DAAPM, Robert D. Gerwin, MD
    Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies; Article in Press
     
  15. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

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    BMJ editorial:
    Soft tissue sore spots of an unknown origin
    Adam Meakins
    Br J Sports Med 2015;49:348 doi:10.1136/bjsports-2014-094502
     
  16. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

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    THE DECLINE AND FALL OF THE TRIGGER POINT EMPIRE
     
  17. Craig Payne

    Craig Payne Moderator

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    6
  18. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

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    Myofascial Trigger Points Then and Now: A Historical and Scientific Perspective
    Jay P. Shah et al
    PM & R; Article in Press
     
  19. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

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  20. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

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    The latest:
    A critical evaluation of Quintner et al: Missing the point
    Jan Dommerholt, PT, DPT, MPS, DAAPM, Robert D. Gerwin, MD
    Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies; April 2015Volume 19, Issue 2, Pages 193–204
    Response to Dommerholt and Gerwin: Did we miss the point?
    John L. Quintner, Geoffrey M. Bove, Milton L. Cohen
    Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies; In Press
    {no abstract}
     
  21. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

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  22. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

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    Quantification of Myofascial Taut Bands
    Qingshan Chen, M.S, Hua-jun Wang, M.D, Ralph E. Gay, M.D, Jeffrey M. Thompson, M.D, Armando Manduca, Ph.D, Kai-Nan An, Ph.D, Richard E. Ehman, M.D, Jeffrey R. Basford, M.D., Ph.D
    PM & R; Article in Press
     
  23. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

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    A Critical Overview of the Current Myofascial Pain Literature ? October 2015
    Jan Dommerholt, PT, DPT, DAAPM, PT, Ph.D Rob Grieve, Todd Hooks, PT, ATC, OCS, SCS, FAAOMPT, Michelle Layton, PT, DPT, OCS, FAAOMPT
    Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies; Article in Press
     
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    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

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  25. bernardbrook

    bernardbrook Member

    Isn't this just a simple concept of muscle spasms in select minute muscle strands caused by stress and pain (which is a normal reaction to those stimuli) and then that affects the surrounding tissues and structures as well since all of our body parts are connected with each other? So even one malalignment on one part can affect the biomechanics of the surrounding structures? And MPS is just a term to describe that spread of affectation from a part that got spasms and affected the surrounding areas? Fibromyalgia though on the other hand might also involve neural connections.
     
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    The Prevalence of Latent Myofascial Trigger Points in Lower Limb Muscles in Asymptomatic Subjects
    J.C. Zuil-Escobar, PhD, C.B. Mart?nez-Cepa, PhD, J.A. Mart?n-Urrialde, PhD, A. G?mez-Conesa, PhD
    PM & R; Article in Press
     
  28. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

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    What Is Evidence-Based About Myofascial Chains: A Systematic Review.
    Wilke J et al
    Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 2016 Mar;97(3):454-61.
     
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