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Activating the gluteal muscles

Discussion in 'Biomechanics, Sports and Foot orthoses' started by NewsBot, Oct 26, 2012.

  1. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

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    THE EFFECTS OF A GLUTEUS MEDIUS TRAINING PROTOCOL ON MUSCLE ACTIVATION AND POSTURAL CONTROL
    Nathan Dorpinghaus
    Masters of Science: Athletic Training; Indiana State University August 2012 (pdf file)
     
  2. Admin2

    Admin2 Administrator Staff Member

  3. admin

    admin Administrator Staff Member

     
    Last edited: Sep 22, 2016
  4. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

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    Which Exercises Target the Gluteal Muscles While Minimizing Activation of the Tensor Fascia Lata? Electromyographic Assessment Using Fine-Wire Electrodes
    David M. Selkowitz, George J. Beneck, Christopher M. Powers
    J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2013;43(2):54-64
    J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2013;43(2):54-64. Epub 16 November 2012. doi:10.2519/jospt.2013.4116
     
  5. Sicknote

    Sicknote Active Member

    Unfortunately many people have tight psoas muscles, rendering the glutes almost useless.
     
  6. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

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    Gluteal muscle activity and patellofemoral pain syndrome: a systematic review
    Christian J Barton, Simon Lack, Peter Malliaras, Dylan Morrissey
    Br J Sports Med 2013;47:207-214
     
  7. Bruce Williams

    Bruce Williams Well-Known Member

    And why is that exactly? Do you think there is a foot relationship between a tight psoas, and if so what would you suggest be done about that?

    Bruce Williams
     
  8. Bruce:

    I wouldn't bother attempting to reason with Sicknote....lots of supratentorial vacuum....from what I have seen.
     
  9. Sicknote

    Sicknote Active Member

    I think it has something to do with the pelvis being heavily in anterior tilt?, (loss of height/poor posture).

    One problem is lack of core strength (pelvic stabilisation). How about too much sitting?. But the most overlooked is too do with the diet. People don't realise what affect certain foods/beverages have on stiffening/tightening the body (muscles/tendons).

    Take people who drink coffee & also do yoga for example. Completely counter productive.
     
  10. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

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    Method for Assessing Brain Changes Associated With Gluteus Maximus Activation
    Beth E. Fisher, Ya-Yun Lee, Erica A. Pitsch, Brian Moore, Anna Southam, Timothy D. Faw, Christopher M. Powers
    J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2013;43(4):214-221.

     
  11. Bruce Williams

    Bruce Williams Well-Known Member

    Ok, now show that it works in patients with knee pain and whether or not their knee pain improves.
    Also, how about testing it while they run, if that is possible, to see if they can do what they were trained to do with their glutes statically.

    Bruce
     
  12. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

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  13. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

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  14. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

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  15. Craig Payne

    Craig Payne Moderator

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    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 22, 2016
  16. Craig Payne

    Craig Payne Moderator

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  17. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

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    Just posted in the Motor responses to Achilles tendon pain thread:

    Neuromotor Control of Gluteal Muscles in Runners with Achilles Tendinopathy
    Smith, Melinda M.; Honeywill, Conor; Wyndow, Narelle; Crossley, Kay M.; Creaby, Mark W.
    Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise: 10 October 2013
     
  18. Sicknote

    Sicknote Active Member

    Don't forget: Gluteus Maximus and minimus are inhibited in most athletes due to tight psoas (Summer, 1988), rendering the glutes useless.

    All the bridging & running drills in the world won't deal with tight hip flexors.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 22, 2016
  19. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

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  20. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

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    Comparison of the Activity of the Gluteus Medius According to the Angles of Inclination of a Treadmill with Vertical Load
    Da-Eun Jeong, Su-Kyoung Lee, Kyoung Kim
    Journal of Physical Therapy Science; Vol. 26 (2014) No. 2 February p. 251-253
     
  21. Craig Payne

    Craig Payne Moderator

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    It was kind of funny watching the fan boys on various blogs and forums start claiming that we need to deal with the glutes in those with achilles tendon problems based on the above study.....go figure.

    What this study showed that gluteal activity was different in those who had achilles tendon problems, which could mean:
    1) Glut problems caused the achilles problem due to a gait alteration
    or
    2) The pain in the achilles tendon changed the gait and that altered the EMG pattern in the glutes.

    I think the overwhelming consensus of pretty much everyone (except for the fan boys) would agree that its probably (2) is the most likely explanation for the findings in the study in the absence of any other evidence. There is certainly nothing in the study saying that the gluts need to be treated in those with achilles problems.

    Having said that, I just picked up this comment in a blog post (ie it carries a lot of weight :dizzy:):
    Not saying I agree with it, but its an interesting thought.
     
  22. efuller

    efuller MVP

    Another quote from that blog post that made my head hurt.


    Yea right, the Achilles is a load bering structue. True that if you are overstriding you have to move your trailing leg farther and faster and that might overload your Achilles.

    Eric
     
  23. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

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  24. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

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    The Gluteus Medius Activation in Female
    Indoor Track Runners is Asymmetrical and
    May be Related to Injury Risk

    Stephanie E. Nevison, Youngmin Jun, James P. Dickey
    Sport Exerc Med Open J. 2015; 1(1):27-34.
     
  25. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

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  26. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

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    DOES THE DUMBBELL CARRYING POSITION CHANGE THE MUSCLE ACTIVITY DURING SPLIT SQUATS AND WALKING LUNGES?.
    Stastny, Petr; Lehnert, Michal; Zaatar Zaki, Amr Mohamed; Svoboda, Zdenek; Xaverova, Zuzana
    Journal of Strength & Conditioning Research: May 08, 2015
     
  27. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

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    The relationship of anticipatory gluteus medius activity to pelvic and knee stability in the transition to single leg stance
    D. Kim, J. Unger, J.L. Lanovaz, A.R. Oates
    PM & R; Article in Press
     
  28. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

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    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 22, 2016
  29. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

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    Evidence of altered corticomotor excitability following targeted activation of gluteus maximus training in healthy individuals.
    Fisher BE, Southam AC, Kuo YL, Lee YY, Powers CM.
    Neuroreport. 2016 Mar 15
     
  30. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

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  31. NewsBot

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    Full text of this is available:

    Strengthening the Gluteus Medius Using Various Bodyweight and Resistance Exercises.
    Stastny, Petr PhD; Tufano, James J. MS; Golas, Artur PhD; Petr, Miroslav PhD
    Strength & Conditioning Journal: April 20, 2016
     
  32. Craig Payne

    Craig Payne Moderator

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    Attached Files:

  33. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

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    Lower-Limb Muscle-Activation Patterns During Off-Axis Elliptical Compared With Conventional Gluteal-Muscle-Strengthening Exercises.
    Lin CY et al
    J Sport Rehabil. 2016 May;25(2):164-172.
     
  34. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

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    Running Related Gluteus Medius Function in Health and Injury: A Systematic Review with Meta-analysis
    Adam Semciw et al
    Journal of Electromyography and Kinesiology; 17 June 2016
     
  35. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

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    A Systematic Review of Rehabilitation Exercises to Progressively Load Gluteus Medius
    Jay R. Ebert et al
    JSR; In Press
     
  36. NewsBot

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