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Ankle dorsiflexion and Osgood Schlatters disease

Discussion in 'Pediatrics' started by NewsBot, May 17, 2008.

  1. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1

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    Limited ankle dorsiflexion: a predisposing factor to Morbus Osgood Schlatter?
    Sarčević Z.
    Knee Surg Sports Traumatol Arthrosc. 2008 May 16. [Epub ahead of print]
     
  2. Admin2

    Admin2 Administrator Staff Member

  3. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Prevalence and Associated Factors of Osgood-Schlatter Syndrome in a Population-Based Sample of Brazilian Adolescents
    Gildásio Lucas de Lucena, Cristiano dos Santos Gomes, Ricardo Oliveira Guerra
    American Journal of Sports Medicine
     
  4. JB1973

    JB1973 Active Member

    "This study is aimed at evaluating a possible relationship between limited dorsiflexion of the ankle and the occurrence of Morbus Osgood Schlatter (MOS) in sports-active children."

    What about less active children. The last two patients I have had that I thought may have osgood schlatters were very inactive ( and overweight). Does the lack of ankle joint dorsiflexion still matter in these guys? Or is the weight more of an issue.
    Cheers
    JB
     
  5. Orthican

    Orthican Active Member

    Hate to resurrect old topics but this one brings to light something my partner and I see quite a bit and is suggestive of a much larger problem overall. In my day to day practice I see a good many adolecents of both sexes and of many variable activity levels. Over the last ten years or so I heve noted an increase in problems such as this. We have noted that the causation of this problem in the high activity adolecent with a case of osgood is almost always the loss of active rom at BOTH the talocrural and knee from a tight triceps surae and tight quad mass. I very RARELY treat this with orthoses. Instead the resolution of symptoms without recurrence involves a good stretching routine.

    In the inactive individuals the problem presents the same and the cause? Inactivity. Too much x box and computer with poor postural habits and over time guess what? ...weak muculature and quite tight as well. Again a good stretching routine will prevail as the most effective of the types of treatments for this problem.

    I have treated the pronator with orthoses in the past for this and see the pronation as more of a red herring as opposed to the genesis of the problem. My reasons for this conclusion are that I have given osgood patients with pronation supports for it and monitored...I have given no support to pronators with osgood and given a stretching routine instead and monitored. Resolution was always achieved faster and with better results (no recurrence) than those who only wore support for the issue.

    But keep in mind this was not anything more than my clinical subjective observation as opposed to any RCT.

    The bigger problem? The computer age will give us quite a bit more of these sorts of problems as opposed to when mom sent them outside to play instead of them sitting down in front of a monitor or tv.
     
  6. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Pathogenic Factors Associated
    With Osgood-Schlatter Disease
    in Adolescent Male Soccer Players
    A Prospective Cohort Study

    Hiroyuki Watanabe et al
    The Orthopaedic Journal of Sports Medicine, 6(8)
     
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