Welcome to the Podiatry Arena forums

You are currently viewing our podiatry forum as a guest which gives you limited access to view all podiatry discussions and access our other features. By joining our free global community of Podiatrists and other interested foot health care professionals you will have access to post podiatry topics (answer and ask questions), communicate privately with other members, upload content, view attachments, receive a weekly email update of new discussions, access other special features. Registered users do not get displayed the advertisements in posted messages. Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please, join our global Podiatry community today!

  1. Everything that you are ever going to want to know about running shoes: Running Shoes Boot Camp Online, for taking it to the next level? See here for more.
    Dismiss Notice
  2. Have you considered the Critical Thinking and Skeptical Boot Camp, for taking it to the next level? See here for more.
    Dismiss Notice
  3. Have you considered the Clinical Biomechanics Boot Camp Online, for taking it to the next level? See here for more.
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Have you considered the Clinical Biomechanics Boot Camp Online, for taking it to the next level? See here for more.
Dismiss Notice
Have you liked us on Facebook to get our updates? Please do. Click here for our Facebook page.
Dismiss Notice
Do you get the weekly newsletter that Podiatry Arena sends out to update everybody? If not, click here to organise this.

Another SALRE model

Discussion in 'Biomechanics, Sports and Foot orthoses' started by Robertisaacs, Oct 5, 2010.


  1. Members do not see these Ads. Sign Up.
    Another study day, another model.

    Pretty simple this one. Its to demonstrate the relevance of axial location with reference to where ORF is most efficient. The pole is fixed on a pin under the heel and can be positioned in various points. A volunteer stands on the X, placing the centre of mass medial to the axis. The green ropes represent different places for an insole to "push" (obviously this is done by pulling on the rope).

    The supination moment needed to "supinate" the "foot" is a constant (body mass of volunteer * distance from axis". A strain guage (fishing scales) shows how much translational force must be applied in a variety of locations in order to acheive this moment.

    Or, in easier terms, how hard the orthotic has to push to move the foot.

    [​IMG]

    I might be able to upload a video after the weekend...
     
  2. stevewells

    stevewells Active Member

    Rob that might make a nice shoe!!
     
  3. It's about 5 ft long and 2 wide!

    Good for walking on snow?...
     
  4. blinda

    blinda MVP

    So where`s the vid? Or was the cameraman not up to scratch?
     
Loading...

Share This Page