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Anterior positional fault of the fibula after ankle sprains

Discussion in 'Biomechanics, Sports and Foot orthoses' started by NewsBot, Jan 30, 2008.

  1. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1

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    Anterior positional fault of the fibula after sub-acute lateral ankle sprains
    Tricia J. Hubbard and Jay Hertel
    Manual Therapy. Volume 13, Issue 1, February 2008, Pages 63-67
     
  2. drsarbes

    drsarbes Well-Known Member

    I can't access the entire paper. Does anyone know how this was measured?

    <<<<<<<<<<<<The sprained ankles had a mean fibular position of 14.2+3.4 mm and were positioned significantly more anteriorly than the contralateral uninjured ankles (17.0+3.2 mm).<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<

    Steve
     
  3. Admin2

    Admin2 Administrator Staff Member

  4. admin

    admin Administrator Staff Member

    ..........
     
  5. Atlas

    Atlas Well-Known Member

    It becomes ridiculous clinically to 'measure' this IMO. But there are ways to determine whether the distal tib-fib joint is "out" (to use a chiropractic term).

    An NZ physio for memory, B. Mulligan, worked this stuff out a while ago; and had clinically relevant ways to deal with it.
     
  6. In vivo fibular motions during various movements of the ankle
    Clinical Biomechanics, Volume 4, Issue 3, August 1989, Pages 155-160
    O. K. Svensson, A. Lundberg, G. Walheirn and G. Selvik

    Abstract

    In eight healthy volunteers the angular and translatory motions of the fibula in relation to the tibia were investigated by roentgenstereophotogrammetry. Tantalum markers (0·8mm) were introduced into the tibia and fibula of the right leg. Examinations were performed with full body load in 10° increments of plantar-/dorsiflexion and pro-/supination of the foot, and during internal/external rotation of the leg. The reproducibility was found to be good. From 30° of plantar flexion to 30° of dorsiflexion there was an average widening of the ankle mortise of 1·04 mm and an average backward translation of the fibula in relation to the tibia of 1·03 mm. These displacements were statistically significant (P < 0·5). Seventy-two per cent of the width increase occurred in the plantar flexion part of the arc. The upwards/downwards displacement of the fibula in no case exceeded 0·1 mm. The outward/inward rotation of the fibula was small. Movements resulting from input pro-/ supination of the foot and from internal/external rotation of the leg were small.
     
  7. TedJed

    TedJed Active Member

    Foot Mobilisation Techniques (FMT) Courses will be conducted in England in April 2010.
    Further information available at www.footmobilisation.com
     
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