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Chinese Foot Binding project on Kickstarter

Discussion in 'General Issues and Discussion Forum' started by Craig Payne, Jun 13, 2014.

  1. Craig Payne

    Craig Payne Moderator

    Articles:
    6

    Members do not see these Ads. Sign Up.
    For those familiar with crowd sourcing and Kickstarter, you might be interested in this project :

    Living History: Bound Feet Women of China
    I backed it with $60 to get the book of photos!
     
  2. Admin2

    Admin2 Administrator Staff Member

  3. Craig Payne

    Craig Payne Moderator

    Articles:
    6
    Jo Farell has let me use these photos:
     

    Attached Files:

  4. Craig Payne

    Craig Payne Moderator

    Articles:
    6
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 22, 2016
  5. Rob Kidd

    Rob Kidd Well-Known Member

    I watched Jo's presentation - and delightful it was too. However I am a little surprised that she was able to do this - maybe I have been misinformed. One of my Sons-in-Law is Chinese and his Grandmother had bound feet - she was 99 when I first and last met her at their red letter party. I made overtures to him that I would just lurve to see her feet but was told to back off - big time. she would have been dreadfully embarrassed and hurt, I was told. she died soon after. The impression I gained was that it was as about as personal as a circumcision - and not to be shared by anyone apart from one's partner. But good on Jo.
     
  6. Admin2

    Admin2 Administrator Staff Member

    Foot binding

    Foot binding was the custom of applying tight binding to the feet of young girls to modify the shape of their feet. It was practiced in China from the Song dynasty until the early 20th century, and bound feet were considered a status symbol as well as a mark of beauty. Foot binding limited the mobility of women, and resulted in lifelong disabilities for most of its subjects, although some women with bound feet working outdoors have also been reported. Feet altered by binding were called lotus feet.

    The practice possibly originated among upper class court dancers during the Five Dynasties and Ten Kingdoms period in 10th century China, then became popular among the elite during the Song dynasty, eventually spreading to all social classes by the Qing dynasty. Foot binding was practiced in different forms, and the more severe form of binding may have been developed in the 16th century. It has been estimated that by the 19th century, 40–50% of all Chinese women may have had bound feet, and up to almost 100% among upper class Chinese women.[1] The prevalence and practice of foot binding however varied in different parts of the country.

    There had been attempts to end the practice during the Qing dynasty; Manchu Kangxi Emperor tried to ban foot binding in 1664 but failed.[2] In the later part of the 19th century, Chinese reformers challenged the practice but it was not until the early 20th century that foot binding began to die out as a result of anti-foot-binding campaigns. Only a few elderly Chinese women still survive today with bound feet.[1]

    1. ^ a b Lim, Louisa (19 March 2007). "Painful Memories for China's Footbinding Survivors". Morning Edition. National Public Radio. 
    2. ^ Cite error: The named reference bbc was invoked but never defined (see the help page).
     
  7. Craig Payne

    Craig Payne Moderator

    Articles:
    6
    ... my copy of her book just arrived today; good addition to the coffee table rather than the bookcase!

    I can't see it on Amazon.com or at BookDepositry yet...
     

    Attached Files:

  8. BEN-HUR

    BEN-HUR Well-Known Member

    About two weeks ago I saw a movie which addressed this issue (Foot Binding)... The Inn of the Sixth Happiness (1958 20th Century Fox film based on the true story of Gladys Aylward... which stared Ingrid Bergman as Aylward). However, Gladys Aylward was apparently upset by the inaccuracy of the movie... which you can now watch in full on YouTube...

     
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 22, 2016
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