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Foot Health Practitioner

Discussion in 'Introductions' started by PamelaM, Jun 28, 2007.

< Hello ! | Hi! >
  1. PamelaM

    PamelaM Welcome New Poster


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    Hi everyone,
    Just wanted to say hello to everyone and hope we will be able to chat and help each other along the way. I am a Foot health practitioner working in Milton Keynes, England.
    Pamela
     
  2. yaruzaru

    yaruzaru Member

    Hello everyone,
    My name is Paul and I am a Foot Health Practitioner in Thornaby, in the northeast of England. I hope to get into the forum when I can. I look forward to catching up with you all.
     
  3. leilani66

    leilani66 Welcome New Poster

    Hello, I'm a Foot Health Practitioner too, in Limavady, Northern Ireland. Just wanted to say hi and introduce myself, Audrey
     
  4. yaruzaru

    yaruzaru Member

    Hi Audrey,
    Nice to see that I am not the only FHP here? How long have you been in practice? I have only been at my clinic since November 2006. It is slowly building up at present I have 122 patients on my books. Are you going to the SMAE Convention oin October at Warwick University? Might see you there if you are!

    Paul Hughes MCFHP MAFHP
    Foot Matters
     
  5. leilani66

    leilani66 Welcome New Poster

    Hi again. I'm in the process of setting up my business, only about 10 clients so far!
    As for the SMAE thing, no, I doubt I'll be there. (I'm not SMAE trained)
    A
     
  6. kerrybear

    kerrybear Member

    hello everyone im excited to be finally starting up. just on the last bits of advertising and now im waiting for the phone to ring.As foot health practitioners how long did it take everyone to get up and running?
     
  7. kerrybear

    kerrybear Member

    hello im a fhp working in the west midlands. hope when your not too busy we can have a chat.
     
  8. cornmerchant

    cornmerchant Well-Known Member

    Yaruzaru

    If you only have 122 patients on your books after 3 and a half years in practice , may I suggest you are doing something wrong.? You cannot possibly make a living with this small patient base unless you are providing treatment more frequently than required.

    Cornmerchant
     
  9. Holly Parkin

    Holly Parkin Member

    Its great to see you fhp's coming out the wood work!!!
     
  10. yaruzaru

    yaruzaru Member

    Since this item was posted My patient database has increased to at least 300. I make a very good living ( I am happy, my accountant is happy too) and it appears to be increasing.





     
  11. quirkyfoot

    quirkyfoot Active Member

    hello and welcome FHPs, hope you enjoy the interaction available here on podiatry arena.
     
  12. ajs604

    ajs604 Active Member

    What a FHP is it the same as a podiatrist - I have never heard this term used before?
     
  13. yaruzaru

    yaruzaru Member

    No it is not the same. I am not allowed to use the term Podiatrist or Chiropodist due to the legal position in that these titles are protected under the ruling of the Health Professions Council. (HPC) I did not get training from a University I got mine through an Organisation called SMAE institute (also known as the College of Foothealth Professionals) However I am governed by the code of ethics and have the relevant insurance to cover my practising.
     
  14. charlie70

    charlie70 Active Member

    No.
    No, a Foot Health Practitioner is not the same as a chiropodist/podiatrist.
    Training to be an FHP is mainly by corresepondence with an average of 6 weeks of clinical practice before they "graduate".

    In the UK the title of chiropodist/podiatrist is protected but the actual profession is not.
    FHPs regard themeselves as being on a par with Podiatrists. Unfortunately the general public is either unaware of the difference or simply confused by it.

    FHPs are not employed in the public sector (ie. the NHS) so they work exclusively in the private sector. They directly compete with podiatrists in the private sector and the "colleges" churn out a huge number of them each year.

    Most podiatrists in the UK would very much like the PROFESSION to be protected and the FHPs to be recognised (by themselves as much as by the general public) as little more than pedicurists.
     
  15. cornmerchant

    cornmerchant Well-Known Member

    Charlie

    Where do you get your figures for average clinical practise times? I am sure that currently the trainers offer either 1 week or 2 if you want to pay the extra! Those with 6 weeks must be very good indeed!

    Cornmerchant
     
  16. charlie70

    charlie70 Active Member

    Jesus H Christ - it's worse than I thought then!
     
  17. yaruzaru

    yaruzaru Member

    Sir - Excuse me for saying so - but you are labouring under a misapprehension. FHP's do not generally see themselves as "on par with podiatrists" its comments like this which inflame the situation. We can work in the private sector because there is a need for those people who often fall through the cracks in the system. IE those elderly or infirm who are not diabetic yet cannot get an NHS visit just to tackle the long thickened nails or having to wait up to 6 months for a nail trim. Our training is only short but we are fully insured have a strict Code of Ethics and above all we do CPD courses to bring our knowledge up to date. We do not stand on our initial merits. We try to improve and you could also say that once we "graduate" we are then doing our apprenticeships in the "field." So do not take the attitude we are to be written off as mere "pedicurists." We are trying to get away from a them and us scenario. You apparently see yourself as better than most people in the profession? If my patients were not satisfied with the level of care that I can possibly give them then they would not return!
     
  18. yaruzaru

    yaruzaru Member

    Regarding the "Profession" by way of a PS to my last post. A patient informed me that someone she approached had closed his books on taking on new patients! So where was this person to go? - others were sought but none were available - I was available and this lady is very happy I did!
     
  19. cornmerchant

    cornmerchant Well-Known Member

    yaruzaru

    You may be an exception to the rule- sadlly a lot of FHPs do not try to improve- CPD is ticking the boxes, not neccessarily improving in clinical skills!
    You are in effect, picking up "pedicures" as you say yourself, they are not high risk, have few problems and want a "toe nail cut".
    What do you do with something outside of your remit? you send it to the GP making it appear that the foot health industry is inadequate at dealing with certain problems. Most of you do not refer to a local podiatrist.I speak as a pod who gets quite a few of these patients through the GP!

    Cornmerchant
     
  20. yaruzaru

    yaruzaru Member

    Oh dear this is becoming quite an epic now. I have have no wish to be embroiled in any friction. I merely chose a toe nail cut as an example I do get other items to do too IE Corns , Verrucae and yes I admit that if it is a bit out of my league, I can then refer to a Podiatrist friend. (Strange as it may seem - I do have Podiatrist friends!) But would you rather I made a hash of things trying to sort things out on my own? Perhaps causing more damage? I think not. I think that after this I shall resign from here as I think that as an FHP I will be seen as the S***t on all you Pods shoes! Pull up the ladder men the FHP's are revolting!!
     
  21. cornmerchant

    cornmerchant Well-Known Member

    "Pull up the ladder men the FHP's are revolting!!"
    __________________
    Probably a good strategy although revolting is probably a little strong!

    Cornmerchant
     
  22. Zuse

    Zuse Active Member

    I am a pod and i do not look down on FHP's at all! i work along side maney FHP's in the NHS and they are very good at what they do!
     
  23. CosmicEgg

    CosmicEgg Member

    In Finland, diabetics get one foot treatment per year paid by the gov't. Otherwise they're on their own. Many are unable to reach their own feet, let alone trim their nails and frequently have no idea of the condition of their feet. Finns have many social flaws that prevent personal contact, even amongst family.

    Another hugely growing problem is with shut-ins, either because of depression (epidemic rates), panic disorder, obesity, etc. No one wants to acknowledge any of them so they are left to rot. This is a former welfare state. Economically we are fairly well off, but the middle-aged and elderly still function with a welfare state mindset. There aren't enough FHPs here to make rounds to these people's homes. Why would it be so horrible if someone just started up a service to provide essentially non-cosmetic/non-medical nail trimming with a nice massage and a bit of a chat? Would that too threaten your podiatric practices? Someone needs to think about the people who need even just the most basic care.
     
  24. Zuse

    Zuse Active Member

    im sorry i got mixed up between FHP's and Podiatry acistants/ FCA's (foor cair acistants) i have no experance of FHP's but im sure most of them are very good at what they do, as with podiatrists!
    Sorry again!
     
  25. CosmicEgg

    CosmicEgg Member

    I wasn't criticising or otherwise attacking you nor anyone else. I was asking what you all think about the need for everyone who comes in contact with any body part of another person needing extensive training in order to do so. I really feel things have gone too far. I've often wondered when we're all going to have to be minimally a GP to be allowed to walk in our own bodies, to be a pediatrician before being allowed to have children, before we age we must be specialists in gerontology, etc. Imagine what a world!

    My question is simply this: people need care so why must there be specialized training for simply providing basic care to those who are unable to do it themselves?
     
  26. Zuse

    Zuse Active Member

    There are maney things that can go wrong duing this basic care such as catching a nail tuft or a patient turing up with an infected ingrowing toenail! The training is to know what to do next and what to look for.
    Often FHP's may be the only health practicioner the patient see's they will be the first or only point of contact for the patient so if the FHP sees an infection, a rash or a dodgy looking mole ect. they need to be trained to spot what is ok and what is not! there have been a few cases where a podiatrist has spoted a malignant melanoma and it can take only a few weeks to kill somone so when they are due back for there treetment they might not be around if you dont spot it and point them in the right direction! this is the reasion for training.

    kind regards
     
  27. CosmicEgg

    CosmicEgg Member

    Okay now you're just missing the point. Nails need trimming monthly. Skin needs sloughing and moisturizing. Fungus needs treatment. I needn't go further. Those of us who can reach our feet can usually manage these things alone, but a depressed or otherwise incapacitated person cannot necessarily do so. Perhaps their mental state is preventing self-care. Those are the people I'm talking about. Not people who need orthotics or what-have-you. Even a normal healthy person can spot an abnormality given sufficient life experience and observational skills.

    These people need inexpensive, regular (monthly) care by someone who can and will look at their feet on their behalf - because they have something in their lives preventing them doing it themselves! If your main concern in life is avoiding panic or just mustering the strength to get out of bed, or any number of other reasons that leave you thinking about other than the condition of your feet, why would a very humane service to do that for you be out of line?

    You know, here in Finland nail fungus is far too mundane for a doctor to bother with. They tell people to either take the (expensive) pills or then that it's simply something that they have to live with. It's not life-threatening so it's really just cosmetic. Is that correct? No, obviously not. But they can't bother to either care for this problem of epic proportions. I see maybe two people per week who don't have any indication of nail fungus. The rest all have it to some degree.

    Maybe people would start to care a bit more if there were some reason to do so. Maybe we start with fundamental care and work upward instead of waiting for the problem to require complicated (i.e., professional) treatment.

    Think about the person, not your practice. I know why the professionals exist, but that's not the point. I can brush my teeth and cut my nails without the help of a professional. But there are many who can't. Do they need to rely on just trained professionals or shouldn't care be available more frequently and inexpensively? Perhaps there wouldn't be so many cases of extreme neglect then, eh?
     
  28. Zuse

    Zuse Active Member

    I am just giving you my thoughts, so i do not appreciate your abruptness!
    i do not know where you got the message that i do not agree with what you do? i was mearly telling you why it is important to be trainied!
    thees patients you talk about, not being able to look after them selfs due to congnative impairment are some of the patients that we treet over here in the NHS. but not every month unless they have more extensive problems with there feet. not thickend disscolored nails due to fungus.
    I am sure that you do a very good job over there and that you patients apreacieat what you do for them! so keep up the good work!
    good luck!
     
  29. charlie70

    charlie70 Active Member

    Unlikely Zuse, since FHPs are not employed by the NHS - some Podiatry Assistants (who carry out basic nail care and assist in nail surgery within the NHS) have been known to also train and practice privately as FHPs. This is not regarded as acceptable but is not illegal so, although frowned upon, continues.
     
  30. Zuse

    Zuse Active Member

    i have allredy notised my mixup. lol!
    Thank you,
    Simon
     
  31. LucyPod

    LucyPod Active Member

    I work in the NHS but there is a private company called caremart who provide a nail cutting service for the patients that you describe. It costs £6 a treatment or £10 for a home visit.
     
  32. CosmicEgg

    CosmicEgg Member

    I don't know where you got the idea that this is what I do. It is not. I am merely raising a suggestion and perhaps asking for thoughts on it. Not only yours were invited, dear sir.

    What I mean is that some people are shut-ins, as mentioned previously, or they are depressed and don't look after themselves. Why would they see a specialist monthly for a nail trim? That's absurd! But even an untrained person can recognise foot/nail fungus and, behaving as a sentient adult, can go and buy fungus cream/gel/spray/powder and attempt a first-line, at-home treatment. One needn't jump to a specialist. This is my single and solitary point. Just because one can no longer reach their feet - for whatever reason - does not mean they should be required to see a specialist for simple care. There should be only a caring soul and general self-awareness necessary for a person to carry out such a service.

    My abruptness, as you call it, is perhaps born out of your inability to understand my meaning. I do hope it's clear now.
     
  33. CosmicEgg

    CosmicEgg Member

    That's exactly what I mean. I'm so pleased that you have it there! We have something vaguely like that here, but they only provide service for one hour per day, and that is broken into three 20-minute pieces (wake-up, help dressing, breakfast; errands, lunch, shopping; shower, ready for bed). God knows how they manage. It's appalling, in my humble view, but it's all retirees can afford. They need better, but Finland is a cold, cold country...
     
  34. Zuse

    Zuse Active Member

    Cosmicegg

    my inability to understand your meaning is probably due to my dyslixia as im not very good at reading or processing writen information! i do not think that that invites you to be rude, dear Sir! i hope you are a bit more patient with your patients when they dont understand what you mean!!
    i fully understand that not only my thorts were invited! so lets move on!

    I think that caremart is a very good idea Lucypod! i feal as tho people can get the treetment they want, that the NHS can not give!:good:
    thank you
     
  35. LucyPod

    LucyPod Active Member

  36. youngpod

    youngpod Member

    "My abruptness, as you call it, is perhaps born out of your inability to understand my meaning. I do hope it's clear now."

    Well if everyone in Finland talks in such riddles no wonder there are communication difficulties! :dizzy:
     
  37. CosmicEgg

    CosmicEgg Member

    My daughter has dysphasia so I very much doubt that my communication skills are in no way lacking - neither written nor spoken. Thank you for your concern though. Our country has two national languages. My other son and daughter manage quite well with five and six languages respectively. I doubt that your lack of understanding stems from dyslexia. But that is irrelevant.

    If you had really read what I wrote, or if indeed you should brazenly re-read it, you will see that Caremark is precisely the sort of thing I had in mind. I was in no way suggesting that people give up on professional treatment when necessary but there is absolutely no good reason for people to pay professional prices and waste professional time when general humanity could supply the service better, faster, and cheaper. That was precisely my point and it was stated quite plainly.

    I really do wonder why so many pods are so defensive and downright aggressive on this forum. :confused:
     
  38. cornmerchant

    cornmerchant Well-Known Member

    Cosmicegg

    Pods are not necessarily aggresive but have every right to be defensive about the work that is being passed on from the NHS to a third sector provider that uses unreguated personnel to provide foot care. There are many pods in PP who are realistic enough to provoide treatment at reduced cost when appropriate- a scheme called 'simply toenails' epitomises this. But sadly the NHS fail to refer on to private pods .
    Why should the more vulnerable have to have treatment from unreguated practitioners who , at the end of the day, are quite often not much cheaper than fully qualified pods ?
    Zuse and youngpod - you need to have a much wider knowledge of the profession before you start thinking that you have all the answers. Caremart is not the answer, it is a cheap government directive which will kill the profession. You pay peanuts, you get monkeys.

    Cornmerchant
     
  39. Zuse

    Zuse Active Member

    Cosmicegg
    You have no idea about my dyslixia or any idea about how it affects me! i am shocked at the fact that you thing you do!

    "I very much doubt that my communication skills are in no way lacking":confused::confused:
    that just says it all!

    I am sorry if i have come across agressive that is not my intention! i am also sorry for any missunderstanding that we have had!
    please can we put this behind us and move on?
    Zuse
     
  40. LucyPod

    LucyPod Active Member

    Its not difficult to cut toe nails. Anyone can do this. I think its a good iniative to help the elderly who can't afford pp prices. Furthermore caremart is only available to oaps so therefore the younger people will still go to pp. Also when patients don't qualify for NHS treatment we always give them a list of local HPC registered pods so they can seek treatment elsewhere. :dizzy:
     
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