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Foot orthotics for sinus tarsi syndrome

Discussion in 'Biomechanics, Sports and Foot orthoses' started by ackers, Jan 11, 2011.

  1. ackers

    ackers Member


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    Hi all out there,

    I am trying to get a feel for what style of inverted heel cup orthoses tx for reduction of sinus tarsi pressure people are getting most benefit from,

    DC wedge style device or heel skived orthoses.

    Apologies from anyone outside oz that don't have a DC wedge knowledge.

    thanks

    I don't have the largest history of heel skived tx and am unsure whether to experiment with this patient?

    cheers
    Ackers
     
  2. Admin2

    Admin2 Administrator Staff Member

  3. Ackers I'm not a fan of the DC wedge due to lateral slide of the heel if the shoe breaks down, but have had good success using medial skive devices with sinus tarsi syndrome.

    But in the end its up to you to determine how to best reduce the STJ pronation moment
     
  4. markjohconley

    markjohconley Well-Known Member

    Goodaye Ackers, I have never had a negative response to DC wedges but I certainly defer (v.tr.) to Michael, try the medial heel skive to alter the STJ moments.
     
  5. Hi

    I have never heard or used a DC wedge before but have treated sinus tarsi syndrome before very successfully with very supportive orthotic devices incorporating heel skives and high medial flanges.

    I have found a combination of proprioceptive exercises, orthoses and corticosteroid injections when needed have produced the best results.

    Mathew Vaughan
    Feet in Focus
     
  6. footdoctor

    footdoctor Active Member

    Hi,

    Rearfoot varus posting

    Inverted device

    High MLA profile

    DC wedge technique

    Medial heel skive

    All means of increasing the external supination moment offered by the device.


    Personally....Inverted device (5-8 degrees), med heel skive(4-8mm), minimal cast dress, semi rigid polypro, high med heel cup (22mm), low lat heel cup (5mm) eva/Puff T/C


    Scott
     
  7. ackers

    ackers Member

    Thanks all for the responses.

    Patient has already come through the Injections into Sinus tarsi under ultrasound.

    I have decided to treat as I would have (DC Wedge) but get a heel skived orthotic made as well for case study purposes.

    Thanks again

    Ackers
     
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