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Foot position during serial casting

Discussion in 'Pediatrics' started by Bug, Jun 18, 2009.

  1. Bug

    Bug Well-Known Member


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    I was part of an interesting physio/podiatry debate today and was hoping to understand more about this.

    We were chatting about metadductus casting and serial casting for neuromuscular interventions ie: spasticity of the gastrocs and what position should the rearfoot be held in.

    Of course the podiatry argument was - STJ neutral (or whatever that is), but based on the age group, perpendicular or slightly inverted. The physio argument was, STJ neutral when the foot is at 90 degrees to the leg, is everted, therefore the foot when casted should also be slightly everted.

    What also came up with a lack of evidence that putting shoes on the wrong feet for semi-rigid metadductus was actually inappropriate. The only reference in a number of texts/ journal articles to it causing excessive pronation was based on author opinion.

    I hope that makes sense, it went around and around but that is basically the end statement of the argument. Help?
     
    Last edited: Jun 18, 2009
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