Welcome to the Podiatry Arena forums

You are currently viewing our podiatry forum as a guest which gives you limited access to view all podiatry discussions and access our other features. By joining our free global community of Podiatrists and other interested foot health care professionals you will have access to post podiatry topics (answer and ask questions), communicate privately with other members, upload content, view attachments, receive a weekly email update of new discussions, access other special features. Registered users do not get displayed the advertisements in posted messages. Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please, join our global Podiatry community today!

  1. Everything that you are ever going to want to know about running shoes: Running Shoes Boot Camp Online, for taking it to the next level? See here for more.
    Dismiss Notice
  2. Have you considered the Critical Thinking and Skeptical Boot Camp, for taking it to the next level? See here for more.
    Dismiss Notice
  3. Have you considered the Clinical Biomechanics Boot Camp Online, for taking it to the next level? See here for more.
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Have you considered the Clinical Biomechanics Boot Camp Online, for taking it to the next level? See here for more.
Dismiss Notice
Have you liked us on Facebook to get our updates? Please do. Click here for our Facebook page.
Dismiss Notice
Do you get the weekly newsletter that Podiatry Arena sends out to update everybody? If not, click here to organise this.

Foot posture and gait

Discussion in 'Biomechanics, Sports and Foot orthoses' started by Trevor Prior, Jun 14, 2015.

  1. Trevor Prior

    Trevor Prior Active Member


    Members do not see these Ads. Sign Up.
    Foot Posture is associated with kinematics of the foot during gait: A comparison of normal, planus and cavus feet.
    Buldt AK, Levinger P, Murley GS, Menz HB, Nester CJ, Landorf KB, Gait & Posture 2015, 42(1):42-48


    Variations in foot posture are associated with the development of some lower limb injuries. However, the mechanisms underlying this relationship are unclear. The objective of this study was to compare foot kinematics between normal, pes cavus and pes planus foot posture groups using a multi-segment foot model. Ninety-seven healthy adults, aged 18–47 were classified as either normal (n = 37), pes cavus (n = 30) or pes planus (n = 30) based on normative data for the Foot Posture Index, Arch Index and normalised navicular height. A five segment foot model was used to measure tri-planar motion of the rearfoot, midfoot, medial forefoot, lateral forefoot and hallux during barefoot walking at a self-selected speed. Angle at heel contact, peak angle, time to peak angle and range of motion was measured for each segment. One way ANOVAs with post-hoc analyses of mean differences were used to compare foot posture groups. The pes cavus group demonstrated a distinctive pattern of motion compared to the normal and pes planus foot posture groups. Effect sizes of significant mean differences were large and comparable to similar studies. Three key differences in overall foot function were observed between the groups: (i) altered frontal and transverse plane angles of the rearfoot in the pes cavus foot; (ii) Less midfoot motion in the pes cavus foot during initial contact and midstance; and (iii) reduced midfoot frontal plane ROM in the pes planus foot during pre-swing. These findings indicate that foot posture does influence motion of the foot.
     
  2. Dennis Kiper

    Dennis Kiper Active Member

    What was the purpose of showing this research
     
  3. Trevor Prior

    Trevor Prior Active Member

    No specific purpose other than sharing the information and showing that there is some link between structure and function.
     
  4. Dennis Kiper

    Dennis Kiper Active Member

    How do you see the final sentence:
    " These findings indicate that foot posture does influence motion of the foot."

    What value do you derive from it?
     
  5. Rob Kidd

    Rob Kidd Well-Known Member

    The Three "F's", Dennis: Biology, Form and Function. Which more correctly should be written as Biology, Form, Function and Ph(F)ylogeny. They should rule your life. If they do not, start looking.
     
  6. Dennis Kiper

    Dennis Kiper Active Member

    "Please God, deliver me whole from my condemnation of those who criticise evolution......."
     
  7. DrBob

    DrBob Active Member

    "Associated with" may be more appropriate than "influenced"?
     
Loading...

Share This Page