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Future Blood Test for Osteoarthritis?

Discussion in 'General Issues and Discussion Forum' started by Mart, Apr 9, 2015.

  1. Mart

    Mart Well-Known Member


    Members do not see these Ads. Sign Up.
    FYI - early days but interesting possibilities for combined use of biomarker assays resulting in high specificity in both early OA and early RA (87% and 91%, respectively) - good sensitivity in OA (73%), compared with healthy controls and patients without RA.


    Ahmed U, Anwar A, Savage RS, et al., Biomarkers of early stage osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis and musculoskeletal Health. Nature Scientific Reports. 2015;5:9259.

    Elevated citrullinated proteins (CPs), a biomarker linked to early rheumatoid arthritis (RA), are also found in patients with early-stage osteoarthritis (OA) – and could be used in a blood test to detect OA years before radiographic damage appears, say these authors.

    Research at the University of Warwick UK found high levels of CPs in patients with early OA and early RA, but autoimmune-linked anti–CCP antibodies (anti-CCPs) occur mostly in early RA. Anti-CCPs are not present in even advanced OA.

    Combined in a single assay, three biomarkers—CPs, anti-CCPs, and the bone-derived substance hydroxyproline (Hyp)—could help distinguish between OA and RA early enough to prevent joint damage.

    The combined experimental algorithm using this assay has high specificity in both early OA and early RA (87% and 91%, respectively) and shows good sensitivity in OA (73%), compared with healthy controls and patients without RA.

    "It has been long established that the autoimmunity of early-stage RA leads to antibodies to CPs, but the autoimmunity, and hence antibodies, are absent in early-stage OA,” explained lead researcher Naila Rabbani PhD, an Associate Professor of Experimental Systems Biology at Warwick’s Medical School.

    “Using this knowledge and applying the algorithm of biomarkers we developed provides the basis to discriminate between these two major types of arthritis at an early stage,”

    Limitations of the current study include the small number of patients (n=181) and the experimental nature of the assay, the authors note. The findings need validation in larger numbers of patients and the biochemical validity assay needs independent confirmation as well.

    Testing for anti-CCPs and rheumatoid factor (RF) is routinely done in diagnosing RA. Anti-CCP is also included in a current panel of assays that can help distinguish OA from RA. That panel (IdentRA™) combines tests for anti-CCP, rheumatoid factor (RF), and a novel biomarker, 14-3-3-ŋ (eta).

    The protein 14-3-3-ŋ is elevated in RA, psoriatic arthritis (PsA), and other rheumatic diseases. but not in OA.

    Cheers

    Martin

    Foot and Ankle Clinic
    1365 Grant Ave.
    Winnipeg Manitoba R3M 1Z8
    phone [204] 837 FOOT (3668)
    fax [204] 774 9918
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