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Helbing's sign - its lineage

Discussion in 'Biomechanics, Sports and Foot orthoses' started by Charlesworth, Oct 22, 2005.

  1. Charlesworth

    Charlesworth Member


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    Hi everyone,

    Helbing's sign is named after the German physician Carl Ernst Helbing [1842-1914]. According to Herman Tax in his text Podopaediatrics, he first discussed what is now referred to as Helbing's sign in a paper published in 1905 entitled Ueber metatarsus varus. Unfortunately, I cannot speak or read German (and I find that the babelfish website is about as useful as a chocolate fireguard) so I cannot verify this.

    Does anybody know when and where he first discussed what we all now know as Helbing's sign, and who first used the term Helbing's sign as an eponym to describe what he observed? Was it one of his students? In addition, when was it first discussed in the podiatry literature?

    Any suggestions would be most helpful. I've exhausted all avenues that I can think of at the moment.

    Thank you in advance.

    My very best wishes,

    Eric.
     
  2. Don ESWT

    Don ESWT Active Member

    Lots of info on Google 77 entries

    Don Scott
     
  3. Charlesworth

    Charlesworth Member

    Helbing's sign

    Don,

    Thanks for that. Funnily enough, undertaking a Google search crossed my mind some time ago. The many entries that do come up tell me nothing more than what Helbing's sign is (which I already know) and who Helbing was (which I already know). It does not give me any detailed information on the points which I raised in my earlier posting.

    Thanks again,

    Eric.
     
  4. Craig Payne

    Craig Payne Moderator

    Articles:
    7
    Eric ...
    I probably can't help as I asume you checked all the older chiropody texts ..

    Can you copy some of the german text here? We do have a few german members here (and my wife can speak german), so someone may be able to help with translation.
     
  5. Charlesworth

    Charlesworth Member

    Helbing's sign

    Craig,

    Thank you so much! Please give me about a week's grace so that I can dig the paper out and copy it for you.

    Your offer is very much appreciated and once again, thanks!

    My very best wishes,

    Eric.
     
  6. David Smith

    David Smith Well-Known Member

    Eric
    Did you know that you can download Google translator and then if you can find your paper on the internet then it can be translated by Google (its a very literal word for word translation but it is possible to get the gist)
    Cheers Dave Smith
     
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