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Hepatitis

Discussion in 'General Issues and Discussion Forum' started by slcam, Nov 21, 2006.

  1. slcam

    slcam Member


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    good day,

    question for those in the know.
    Can hepatitis A have neuromuscular effects? for example, muscule wasting leading to pes cavus foot type?
    i am aware there can be neuropathy and polymyalgia but cannot find any information on long term consequences of the disease in relation to the lower limb.

    thanks :)
     
  2. John Spina

    John Spina Active Member

    I know of nothing offhand but I will look it up and I do thank you for a thought provoking post.
     
  3. Anne McLean

    Anne McLean Active Member

    Very interesting question. I am not aware of any neuromuscular effects of Hepatitis A, although I believe that Hepatitis B and C could lead to abnormal neuromuscular function and impaired mental status where there is a major failure of liver function.

    Regards

    Anne
     
  4. John Spina

    John Spina Active Member

    It could also be related to meds they are taking and change in bowel habits,if any.
     
  5. slcam

    slcam Member

    thanks for some replies........
    actually the case that has got me thinking about this is that of a 35 years old female who has no other medical history other than a case of Hep when she was 8 years old, she doesn't remember Which strain she had although i'm guessing it was Hep A???
    She presented with the usual foot pain but on gait assessment and static assessment she has unilateral global pes cavus.
    it got me thinking and when i started trying to research this i got some info on neuropathy, fibromyalgia etc but there was no info specific to the foot. i thought if there was nerve damage then maybe this could be the cause of the difference in foot posture????
     
  6. Anne McLean

    Anne McLean Active Member

    Is she aware of always having had pes cavus, or did this develop after her bout of hepatitis?

    Whilst I agree with John that medication could be a factor, I fear that in the case of an eight year old child, she would have cleared her Hep A quite quickly and, shouldn't have had to continue with medication after that. You seem unsure what strain she atually had. As I said initially, Hepatitis B and C would be more likely to lead to abnormal neuromuscular function.

    Just another thought - have you looked at Charcot Marie Tooth Disease as a possible cause? Autosomal recessive Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease usually manifests early in life, normally before the age of 10. Other forms affect people in their twenties and thirties. See the excellent article from Curtin (http://www.podiatry.curtin.edu.au:16080/encyclopedia/ciecle/#introduction).

    Regards

    Anne
     
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