Welcome to the Podiatry Arena forums

You are currently viewing our podiatry forum as a guest which gives you limited access to view all podiatry discussions and access our other features. By joining our free global community of Podiatrists and other interested foot health care professionals you will have access to post podiatry topics (answer and ask questions), communicate privately with other members, upload content, view attachments, receive a weekly email update of new discussions, access other special features. Registered users do not get displayed the advertisements in posted messages. Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please, join our global Podiatry community today!

  1. Everything that you are ever going to want to know about running shoes: Running Shoes Boot Camp Online, for taking it to the next level? See here for more.
    Dismiss Notice
  2. Have you considered the Critical Thinking and Skeptical Boot Camp, for taking it to the next level? See here for more.
    Dismiss Notice
  3. Have you considered the Clinical Biomechanics Boot Camp Online, for taking it to the next level? See here for more.
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Have you considered the Clinical Biomechanics Boot Camp Online, for taking it to the next level? See here for more.
Dismiss Notice
Have you liked us on Facebook to get our updates? Please do. Click here for our Facebook page.
Dismiss Notice
Do you get the weekly newsletter that Podiatry Arena sends out to update everybody? If not, click here to organise this.

Hip Posterolateral Musculature Strengthening in Sedentary Women With Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome: A

Discussion in 'Biomechanics, Sports and Foot orthoses' started by RobinP, Oct 18, 2012.

  1. RobinP

    RobinP Well-Known Member


    Members do not see these Ads. Sign Up.
    Hip Posterolateral Musculature Strengthening in Sedentary Women With Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome: A Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial With 1-Year Follow-up
    Thiago Yukio Fukuda, William Pagotti Melo, Bruno Marcos Zaffalon, Flavio Marcondes Rossetto, Eduardo MagalhĆ£es, Flavio Fernandes Bryk, RobRoy L. Martin
    DOI: 10.2519/jospt.2012.4184

    STUDY DESIGN: Randomized controlled trial. OBJECTIVES: To determine if adding hip-strengthening exercises to a conventional knee exercise program produces better long-term outcomes than conventional knee exercises alone in women with patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS). BACKGROUND: Recent studies have shown that a hip-strengthening program reduces pain and improves function in individuals with PFPS. However, there are no clinical trials evaluating long-term outcomes of this type of program compared to conventional knee-strengthening and -stretching exercises. METHODS: Fifty-four sedentary women between 20 and 40 years of age, with a diagnosis of unilateral PFPS, were randomly assigned knee exercise (KE) or knee and hip exercise (KHE). The women in the KE group (n = 26; mean age, 23 years) performed a 4-week conventional knee-stretching and -strengthening program. The women in the KHE group (n = 28; mean age, 22 years) performed the same exercises as those in the KE group, as well as strengthening exercises for the hip abductors, lateral rotators, and extensors. An 11-point numeric pain rating scale, the Lower Extremity Functional Scale, the Anterior Knee Pain Scale, and a single-hop test were used as outcome measures at baseline (pretreatment) and 3, 6, and 12 months posttreatment. RESULTS: At baseline, demographic, pain, and functional assessment data were similar between groups. Those in the KHE group had a higher level of function and less pain at 3, 6, and 12 months compared to baseline (P<.05). In contrast, the KE group had reduced pain only at the 3- and 6-month follow-ups (P<.05), without any changes in Lower Extremity Functional Scale, Anterior Knee Pain Scale, or hop testing (P>.05) through the course of the study. Compared to the KE group, the KHE group had less pain and better function at 3, 6, and 12 months posttreatment (P<.05). For the Lower Extremity Functional Scale, the between-group difference in change scores from baseline at 3, 6, and 12 months posttreatment favored the KHE group by 22.0, 22.0, and 20.8 points, respectively. CONCLUSION: Knee-stretching and -strengthening exercises supplemented by hip posterolateral musculatureā€“strengthening exercises were more effective than knee exercises alone in improving long-term function and reducing pain in sedentary women with PFPS. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Therapy, level 1a.
    J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2012;42(10):823-830, Epub 2 August 2012. doi:10.2519/jospt.2012.4184
    KEY WORDS: anterior knee pain, chondromalacia, knee, patella


    PM me if you want a copy
     
Loading...

Share This Page