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How to Walk Without Pain

Discussion in 'General Issues and Discussion Forum' started by rmallia, May 29, 2013.

  1. rmallia

    rmallia Member


    Members do not see these Ads. Sign Up.
    Since the forum won't publish the last post, I am going to try to post my book for download from this site. It has been reviewed and distributed throughout several countries and is very informative to the layman.

    Dr. Richard S. Mallia
     

    Attached Files:

  2. Craig Payne

    Craig Payne Moderator

    Articles:
    6
  3. rmallia

    rmallia Member

    I stand corrected, the message was indeed posted, it was the delay that had me somewhat confused.

    In any case, in this tech society I believe many can benefit from this book. Therefore, it is presented.

    Thanks
     
  4. Griff

    Griff Moderator

    My rule when looking at these things is to pick a page at random, read that page and then decide if it is worth my time to read the rest. I landed on page 12 where I read that 15 times body weight is accepted by each foot when walking. Reference?

    I'm all for free information on the internet Richard, and have no problem with people simplifying language for a lay audience. But to be of significant use or value surely it needs to be accurate and based on fact...?
     
  5. rmallia

    rmallia Member

    Actually, that is a typo that should read, 1.5 times the body weight. The decimal point has been overlooked by many, I assure you. It will be corrected ASAP. Thanks for pointing that out to me. I assure a very difficult error to find for the non-podiatric oriented for whom this book is intended, yet, a most (10X) grievous error on my part.
     
  6. rmallia

    rmallia Member

    Here is the reference for the 1.5 times the body weight and unless it is a typo (i.e missing decimal point) the book is based on fact that can be referenced.

    WALKING SPEED AS A BASIS FOR NORMAL AND ABNORMAL GAIT MEASUREMENTS
    Author(s): ANDRIACCHI, TP (ANDRIACCHI, TP); OGLE, JA (OGLE, JA); GALANTE, JO (GALANTE, JO)
    Source: JOURNAL OF BIOMECHANICS Volume: 10 Issue: 4 Pages: 261-268 DOI: 10.1016/0021-9290(77)90049-5 Published: 1977
    Times Cited: 293 (from Web of Science)
    Cited References: 10
    Accession Number: WOS:A1977DG31500006
    Document Type: Article
    Language: English
     
  7. rmallia

    rmallia Member

    Also, I would like to add, in the third edition I will be adding references to the book to bolster up its credibility. I wanted to get the book out sooner because so many people may benefit from the information.
     
  8. Lab Guy

    Lab Guy Well-Known Member

    I am giving the book 1/2 star. My personal opinion:

    The book is not written for the layman but for a health professional. It might be a decent book for a family practice resident to read to get an overview of some of the foot problems but common problems such HAV, FHL, Neuromas, TTS, lesser metatarsalgia, Cavus feet, PT dysfunction, shin splints, warts, IPKs, soft interdigital corns, ect was not included. The book is incomplete.

    You wrote about plantar fasciitis but should have advised the reader to avoid surgery and told the the reader why. Since your book title is "How to walk without pain", you want to give your readers the inside scoop that they cannot find through google.

    Why did you mention specific products by name? If your going to mention Formula 3, why not mention all the topical antifungal medications so that there is no bias, no hidden agenda? Is the e book a vehicle to get paid to promote products?

    You should think about paying a professional writer to transform what you have written into language the layperson could understand. You also need complete the book as you omitted many common foot problems. Read some books from the Dummies series to get an idea on how to make the material easy to understand and fun to read. Also, Photos of a needle in a foot and gross mycotic nails need not be included unless you want to scare your readers.

    Many professionals write a book to make themselves appear to be the expert in their field. That is fine and all the power to them. If that is what you wish to do then you still have a lot of work to do and I would wait prior to making it available, even if it is free. There is no rush. Good luck.

    Steven
     
  9. davidh

    davidh Podiatry Arena Veteran

    I haven't read the book. I already walk without pain;).

    Seriously, you would have been better to ask opinions from the public and Health Professionals on what to include, rather than just putting a link in.
     
  10. blinda

    blinda MVP

    For professional credibilty, appropriate references are a must from the outset.

    Unlike Ian G, I dived straight into the derm section and stopped reading after I found this;

    "There are some topical therapies that require more diligence and time in application of treatment that are also very safe. The efficacy of these medications is not considered very high....(you then mention Kerol ZX and Formula-3, highlighting their money-back guarantee)...Another topical liquid used for fungal nail therapy has been pure Tea Tree Oil which although has anti-fungal properties, has not been researched for the treatment of fungal nails."

    As Steven pointed out; this paragraph comes across as a sales pitch for Formula-3. Also, whilst you acknowledge lack of proven efficacy of Tea Tree Oil (TTO), you published pictures of a pt who applied TTO x3 daily in combination with oral terbinafine as a kind-of case study, thereby endorsing its application. Worse still, you included TTO amongst therapies “that are also very safe!”. It is NOT safe.

    Apologies to those who have heard this all before, but (and yes I have copied `n pasted what I have repeatedly stated); regardless of the unproven efficacy of TTO, my greatest concern is that practitioners are continuing to recommend the use of TTO without first explaining the risks, i.e. the nature of oxidation. In TTO the oxidation process of terpenoids leads to the formation of peroxides, epoxides and endoperoxides. The potency of these to act as triggers for contact allergy increases with oxidation of the oil upon exposure to light, moisture, heat and air. So much so that, oxidated TTO has a sensitizing capacity multiple times stronger than a newly opened fresh bottle of TTO, after just a few days if opened daily, thus rendering the oil as a severe irritant. Terpenoids have been documented as known sensitizers for allergic contact dermatitis for many years and the incidence of reactions to oxidized TTO is recorded by the EU as being relevant enough to warrant warnings on TTO products.

    We often hear about the `natural antimicrobial` effects of TTO in the media, which to the un-suspecting public equates to `safe`. Note what Frances Fewell, director of the Institute for Complementary Medicine states; “Because essential oils are natural products, the public often assumes they must be safe. You should never apply any sort of essential oil directly to the skin without diluting it first in a suitable carrier oil. Tea tree oil has become very popular, and many people have started applying it directly to deal with acne and skin infections. In fact this is a very aggressive oil. The skin can dry out, blister or form a rash.”

    In addition to the associated risk of allergy, the New England Journal of Medicine published evidence that TTO has properties that can lead to gynaecomastia - the growth of breasts in males. The researchers stated that when the boys in their study stopped using TTO, the breasts disappeared. They, therefore, concluded that the repeated use of such oils may also disrupt hormonal function.

    So, TTO is neither safe nor efficacious and should not be recommended by any Health Care Professional.


    Cheers,
    Bel
     
  11. davidh

    davidh Podiatry Arena Veteran

    In my last NHS post I saw a child of around 12 years of age whose mum had applied Tea Tree Oil to her verrucae.

    The child was referred to me because she couldn't weightbear. When I eventually persuaded her to take of her shoe and sock the worst blister I have ever seen was revealed. It was a bulla the size of most of the plantar surface.

    We guessed this was a reaction to the TTO. Once drained it was pain-free, and resolved very quickly. The VPs remained.
     
  12. Lab Guy

    Lab Guy Well-Known Member

    Richard, what Belinda wrote, is an excellent sample of what people want and need to read to take responsibility of their health.

    Steven
     
  13. Perhaps a little Harsh.

    Quite a few things which made me grind my teeth, but nothing too egregious or new (possible exception of the tea tree oil thing). It is, after all, a book for the lay public.

    There is some good and sound stuff there, notwithstanding the brand placement. My main issue with it is that it is presented as a totality. A patient is presented, for example, with one diagnosis for heel pain, plantar fasciitis, and one cause, Pronation. Much of the information about plantar fasciitis is sound! Its not a bad summary, we've seen much worse. But what of the patient with baxters neuritis, Calcaneal bursiitis or plain old fashioned bruising who reads this book? They will come away with quite the wrong idea. Thats the peril of presenting a book on how to walk without pain rather than some information on a few common conditions.

    I think there is some good stuff here which could be of significant benifit to a patient searching for information. However I think its a mistake to present it as an "ebook" rather than what it is, A serious of helpful and informative (mostly) articles.

    Cmon guys lets cut Richard a little slack here. He's not writing a textbook.

    However, I do dream of a world where classifying insoles as functional or accomadative is punishable by death. Or birching at least. But thats just me.
     
  14. blinda

    blinda MVP

    You`re right. Sorry, Richard. I can only blame my lack of nails `n knuckles for my grumpiness of late (If I ever say I`m thinking of moving clinic again, please talk me out of it).

    Good luck with your edited versions, I hope you find the constructive criticism offered here useful.

    Cheers,
    Bel
     
  15. rmallia

    rmallia Member

    Ok, I corrected the 15X the body weight on page 12. I stand by my safety and efficacy rule on the TTO. After seeing it used on thousands of patients and not one adverse reaction and significant clinical findings, there certainly seems to be great empirical evidence from my perspective. I have had much feedback from my residency director, several professors from my school, clinicians (including orthopedics and dermatologists) as well as friend who have no relation to the medical sciences. The responses have been overwhelmingly favorable, and call it what you will, the information is important and sound from my perspective. Tea Tree Oil has been used for thousands of years and if used incorrectly may cause serious problems, of course.
     

    Attached Files:

  16. Lab Guy

    Lab Guy Well-Known Member

    I am sorry too if I was a bit harsh on my first post. I just quit smoking and drinking, and on a low carb diet, and off my meds, but still inhaling too much glue in the lab and still suffer insomnia.

    Question, on page 26 you have before and after photos upon completion of a one year course of treatment for onychomycosis. Are the two photos on page 26 of the same patient? On the before photo it appears as if the second and third toe are syndactalized. On the after photo, a severe HAV is present with the hallux pressing against the third toe. Do you think the photos got mixed up? If so, something to fix for your next edition.

    For health professionals wishing more information (difficult to comprehend for the general public) I give it a higher rating although you need to cover much more to make it more complete. Perhaps a different title such as "Common Foot Disorders and Their Treatment". Your current title suggests you have something magical to offer your reader to walk in comfort.

    I think the you can market the book not to the public but to internists and family physicians that want an overview of the common pathological conditions of the foot. The book, plus speaking at your local hospitals will help you I gain credibility in the eyes of the medical community.

    I also think its best for people to see a doctor rather than try to read a book and try to diagnose and treat themselves. More often than not, they just get more confused or get wrong information.

    Best of luck,

    Steven
     
  17. Along with trepanning, acupuncture, eating dung and dying of cholera.

    Weakest argument ever.

    If TT is so great why has there never been a favourable in vivo study.? You know about regression to the mean, placebo etc. The plural if anecdote is anecdotes NOT data.
     
  18. blinda

    blinda MVP

    Well, it was a `typo`, after all. Wasn`t it?

    Oh, well that makes it alright then. Your `perspective` is obviously far superior to the scientific evidence.....

    First and foremost the safety of use of TTO in practice has been raised by many bodies, such as the Federal Institute for Risk Assessment (see here: http://www.bfr.bund.de/cm/349/use_of_undiluted_tea_tree_oil_as_a_cosmetic.pdf)

    Taken from the above document:

    The EU Scientific Committee also expressed serious concerns about the safety of TTO in products, back in 2004 (see the strongly worded report here: http://ec.europa.eu/health/ph_risk/committees/04_sccp/docs/sccp_o_00c.pdf) This is a rather lengthy document, but the conclusion reads:
    Put simply, the EU stated that `even small amounts of the undiluted oil could be unsafe and unstable after clinical trials found users risked rashes and allergies as it is a severe irritant to the skin and degraded rapidly if exposed to air, light and heat`.

    As my learned colleagues pointed out; No clinical studies have revealed superiority of TTO over existing licensed pharmacological treatments for HPV, tinea pedis or onychomicosis. The in vitro tests show it has "potential as a therapeutic agent", but the in vivo clinical trials have shown it useless. The majority of trials quoted in favour of the antiseptic and antifungal effects of TTO have been carried out in vitro. The clinical in vivo trials often revealed it to be no better than placebo. (Rutherford et al, 2007) http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17535193

    Just in case you require more EVIDENCE that TTO is not safe, here are some further studies;

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10357714
    Taken from the above;

    TEA TREE OIL IN THE TREATMENT OF TINEA PEDIS, Melinda M. Tong, Phillip M. Altman, Ross StC. Barnetson. Australasian Journal of Dermatology; Volume 33 Issue 3, Pages 145 - 149; Published Online: 28 Jun 2007 http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1440-0960.1992.tb00103.x/abstract

    Gas gangrene and osteomyelitis of the foot in a diabetic patient treated with tea tree oil. Cooney DR, Cooney NL. Int J Emerg Med. 2011 Apr 14;4:14. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21559069?dopt=Abstract

    Aberer W. Contact allergy and medicinal herbs. Journal of the German Society of Dermatology (2008) 6; 15 -24 http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17919303

    Hausen BM. Evaluation of the main contact allergens in oxidized tea tree oil. Dermatitis2004; 15: 213-14 http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15842068



    Those are just a handful of peer-reviewed articles demonstrating the harmful effects in the use of TTO. There are more....

    What time does the pub open?
     
  19. W J Liggins

    W J Liggins Well-Known Member


    Forgive the vulgarity but your remark deserves it:

    'eat excrement; 10 billion flies can't be wrong'.

    Bill Liggins
     
  20. blinda

    blinda MVP

    Quote of the week, cheers Bill :drinks

    PS:
    Indeed. But, you omitted syphilis. It`s been around since the 15th Century, doesn`t make it desirable.
     
  21. rmallia

    rmallia Member

    Trepaning if one has a swollen hematoma pressing on the brain can be very effective. The jury is still out on acupuncture although adverse reactions are rare, I am not familiar with eating dung as therapy for any disease nor cholera as a treatment. Aspirin, Quinine, Alcohol, Tobacco, Opium and others are examples of medications indicated for a multitude of therapies that thanks to market based research are not profitable enough to do the REAL research, ie large samples, correlations that explain large amounts of variables.....

    Bacteria and Parasites existed before us and will after humans, doesn't relate to their treatments.
     
  22. blinda

    blinda MVP

    Still no references then to "REAL research" with regard to the efficacy or safety of the use of Tea Tree Oil, yet you insist on `stand[ing] by your rule` in promoting it, flying in the face of evidenced based research (as opposed to `market based research`). Nevermind.
     
  23. blinda

    blinda MVP

    Back to the original post;

    Question; Define `layman` please, Richard?
     
  24. rmallia

    rmallia Member

    Layman: a person who does not belong to a particular profession or who is not expert in some field
     
  25. blinda

    blinda MVP

    K, your reply to this question was quick, so why the delay in your evidenced reply to your asserted efficacy and safety of TTO....

    Anyhoo, I agree wholeheartedly with Steve, particularly with the bit highlighted in bold, again;

    I just don`t get what, or at whom, your e-book is directed at. `tis neither a comprehensive/accurate scientific textbook, nor a patient centred (no apology for English spelling) medical advice text, at least from my `perspective`.
     
  26. Lab Guy

    Lab Guy Well-Known Member

    Blinda, you just gotta avoid some threads, or you will end up spending all your time in the local pub :D

    Steven
     
  27. rmallia

    rmallia Member

    OK, Let me make this simple. The book has two aims, 1. To promote the awareness of podiatry and podiatric medicine and 2. To educate the public as to some areas where they may be able to avoid common problems with the feet.

    I have spent thousands and have not made a singe penny, pound, or euro from the book as neither fame nor fortune has been my motive. Many have been eluding to the fact that brand names are mentioned and this is only for convenience to the public and I have not received nor expect to receive any compensation for the mention of their names. Any other insinuation is insulting, professionally and personally.

    If it does not suit up to your standards scientifically then, as with a TV channel you do not like, do not pay attention. In any case here is the book, challenge it as you will, argue with its facts, but that is it. On this side of the pond it has been well received.
     
  28. Righto.

    Thanks for illustrating the so point beautifully.

    [​IMG]
    Tobacco for asthma. What could go wrong? I mean yes there are studies which show concerns over it being carcinogenic (like Tea Tree oil) and irritant (like tea tree oil) but hey, its been used for years and lots of people report health benefits (just like tea tree oil) so hey, lets recommend smoking to the public. Not under medical instruction you understand, lets just recommend it to the lay public and let them decide.

    Its 40 pages long and published on the internet! How on earth did you manage to spend thousands on it?

    Sorry chief, doesn't work like that. If you put something up for consideration by a group of people you can't expect good feedback from the ones who like it and the ones who don't just to keep schtum and look elsewhere. I'm afraid you take the rough with the smooth. Also, if your goal is to educate the public (who we all see) then we do all have a vested interest in them not being Mis-educated.

    Ah. Facts. Yes, it does contain some facts. But they are not what is being argued with. Much of what is being disputed are those things which you REPRESENT as facts, but are in fact opinion masquerading as facts. And that's one of the big issues, there is nothing wrong with opinion when it is clearly stated as such. Saying its a fact does not make it so.

    The Tea tree thing is a rather nice example. You offered opinion. Blinda offered science. Referenced science and authoritative, independent sources. In your clinic you are the big dog and mountains may tremble as you pass wind. To the lay person, who knows no better, this may indeed be well received. However here, among your peers we need a little more than "I really think so and so do my friends" to convince us of a position when the actual real live science holds the opposite position.
     
    Last edited: Jun 1, 2013
  29. blinda

    blinda MVP

    OK, let me make this simple: you are NOT presenting `facts`with regard to TTO. Continuing to state that it is "very safe" when you have been presented with contrary evidence, is irresponsible at best.

    It`s not just podiatrists on this side of the pond who are obliged to practice evidenced-based medicine.
     
  30. Lab Guy

    Lab Guy Well-Known Member

    Quote:
    I have spent thousands and have not made a singe penny, pound, or euro from the book
    Its 40 pages long and published on the internet!

    How on earth did you manage to spend thousands on it?


    Richard spent thousands as his first edition is sold on Amazon.com. He used Dorrance Publishing, a vanity press, to self- publish his book. Dorrance Publishing charges $6000 to $10,000 to publish your own book. If the book has really good potential, then the author would not use a vanity press but use a reputable publisher that would pay the author rather than the other way around.

    Vanity presses are often used by authors that want to promote themselves and their business. Apparently, Richard was unhappy with paying the fees to Dorrance Publishing and took his manuscript to the internet in the form of an e-book.

    The American Podiatric Medicine Association (APMA) does a great deal of work in educating the public. If people want to get involved in educating the public about Podiatry, then there are many resources from the APMA, if that is, your a member.

    Steven
     
  31. Ouch!

    If I was going to fork over 6000 of my money, I'd want the book to be a bit more... Finished! I mean there are as I said some good bits, but it's more of a pamphlet than a book in its present form. The inclusion of chapters on, say, verrucae, mortons neuroma, MTSS etc would make the book far more widely applicable. If I bought this book to find out why my feet hurt it would be no help to me at all unless I had one of that very specific set of conditions.
     
  32. rmallia

    rmallia Member

    Yes, Steven quotes the truth on how I spent thousands on the book. The contract expired and decided to go open source, i.e no charge.

    My personal observation of over 4,000 cases on onychomycosis treated with tea tree oil serves as sufficient Empirical Evidence for me to use and recommend the substance. I believe what is personally observed over some research of which the quality is unknown. The real world is far different from the lab. Also, the quality of Tea Tree Oil has been known to differ from brand to brand.

    I never claimed to seek fame or fortune from this book, neither did I expect such a hullabaloo. But as was said before "whatever".

    As for using a vanity press, it was for exposure, not to promote anything or any business.

    "Fare thee well now, let the words be yours, I am done with mine."
     
  33. rmallia

    rmallia Member

    Topically applied Melaleuca alternifolia (tea tree) oil causes direct anti-cancer cytotoxicity in subcutaneous tumour bearing mice.
    Ireland DJ, Greay SJ, Hooper CM, Kissick HT, Filion P, Riley TV, Beilharz MW.
    Source
    School of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine (M504), Faculty of Medicine, Dentistry and Health Sciences, The University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley, WA 6009, Australia. demelza.ireland@uwa.edu.au
    Abstract
    BACKGROUND:
    Melaleuca alternifolia (tea tree) oil (TTO) applied topically in a dilute (10%) dimethyl sulphoxide (DMSO) formulation exerts a rapid anti-cancer effect after a short treatment protocol. Tumour clearance is associated with skin irritation mediated by neutrophils which quickly and completely resolves upon treatment cessation.
    OBJECTIVE:
    To examine the mechanism of action underlying the anti-cancer activity of TTO.
    METHODS:
    Immune cell changes in subcutaneous tumour bearing mice in response to topically applied TTO treatments were assessed by flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry. Direct cytotoxicity of TTO on tumour cells in vivo was assessed by transmission electron microscopy.
    RESULTS:
    Neutrophils accumulate in the skin following topical 10% TTO/DMSO treatment but are not required for tumour clearance as neutrophil depletion did not abrogate the anti-cancer effect. Topically applied 10% TTO/DMSO, but not neat TTO, induces an accumulation and activation of dendritic cells and an accumulation of T cells. Although topical application of 10% TTO/DMSO appears to activate an immune response, anti-tumour efficacy is mediated by a direct effect on tumour cells in vivo. The direct cytotoxicity of TTO in vivo appears to be associated with TTO penetration.
    CONCLUSION:
    Future studies should focus on enhancing the direct cytotoxicity of TTO by increasing penetration through skin to achieve a higher in situ terpene concentration. This coupled with boosting a more specific anti-tumour immune response will likely result in long term clearance of tumours.
    Copyright © 2012 Japanese Society for Investigative Dermatology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

    Clearance of tumors? I hope this article is not too recent for you, after I get tired look at all your decade old articles (or more, i.e 2001)
     
  34. rmallia

    rmallia Member

    Mycopathologia. 2013 Apr;175(3-4):281-6. doi: 10.1007/s11046-013-9622-7. Epub 2013 Feb 8.
    Antifungal activity of nanocapsule suspensions containing tea tree oil on the growth of Trichophyton rubrum.
    Flores FC, de Lima JA, Ribeiro RF, Alves SH, Rolim CM, Beck RC, da Silva CB.
    Source
    Programa de Pós-Graduação em Ciências Farmacêuticas, Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, Santa Maria, RS, Brazil.
    Abstract
    The aim of this study was to evaluate, for the first time, the antifungal efficacy of nanocapsules and nanoemulsions containing Melaleuca alternifolia essential oil (tea tree

    oil) in an onychomycosis model. The antifungal activity of nanostructured formulations was evaluated against Trichophyton rubrum in two different in vitro models of

    dermatophyte nail infection. First, nail powder was infected with T. rubrum in a 96-well plate and then treated with the formulations. After 7 and 14 days, cell viability was

    verified. The plate counts for the samples were 2.37, 1.45 and 1.0 log CFU mL(-1) (emulsion, nanoemulsion containing tea tree oil and nanocapsules containing tea tree oil,

    respectively). A second model employed nails fragments which were infected with the microorganism and treated with the formulations. The diameter of fungal colony was

    measured. The areas obtained were 2.88 ± 2.08 mm(2), 14.59 ± 2.01 mm(2), 40.98 ± 2.76 mm(2) and 38.72 ± 1.22 mm(2) for the nanocapsules containing tea tree oil, nanoemulsion

    containing tea tree oil, emulsion and untreated nail, respectively. Nail infection models demonstrated the ability of the formulations to reduce T. rubrum growth, with the

    inclusion of oil in nanocapsules being most efficient.
     
  35. rmallia

    rmallia Member

    BMC Dermatol. 2010 Aug 20;10:6. doi: 10.1186/1471-5945-10-6.
    A randomised, assessor blind, parallel group comparative efficacy trial of three products for the treatment of head lice in children--melaleuca oil and lavender oil, pyrethrins and piperonyl butoxide, and a "suffocation" product.
    Barker SC, Altman PM.
    Source
    Parasitology Section, School of Chemistry & Molecular Biosciences, and UniQuest Pty, Ltd,, University of Queensland, St Lucia, Queensland, 4072 Australia. s.barker@uq.edu.au
    Abstract
    BACKGROUND:
    There are many different types of pediculicides available OTC in Australia. In this study we compare the efficacy and safety of three topical pediculicides: a pediculicide containing melaleuca oil (tea tree oil) and lavender oil (TTO/LO); a head lice "suffocation" product; and a product containing pyrethrins and piperonyl butoxide (P/PB).
    METHOD:
    This study was a randomised, assessor-blind, comparative, parallel study of 123 subjects with live head lice. The head lice products were applied according to the manufacturer's instructions (the TTO/LO product and the "suffocation" product were applied three times at weekly intervals according to manufacturers instructions (on Day 0, Day 7 and Day 14) and the P/PB product was applied twice according to manufacturers instructions (on Day 0 and Day 7)). The presence or absence of live lice one day following the last treatment was determined.
    RESULTS:
    The percentage of subjects who were louse-free one day after the last treatment with the product containing tea tree oil and lavender oil (41/42; 97.6%) and the head lice "suffocation" product (40/41, 97.6%) was significantly higher compared to the percentage of subjects who were louse-free one day after the last treatment with the product containing pyrethrins and piperonyl butoxide (10/40, 25.0%; adj. p < 0.0001).
    CONCLUSION:
    The high efficacy of the TTO/LO product and the head lice "suffocation" product offers an alternative to the pyrethrins-based product.
    TRIAL REGISTRATION:
    The study was entered into the Australian/New Zealand Clinical Trial Registry, ACTRN12610000179033.
     
  36. rmallia

    rmallia Member

    Nat Prod Commun. 2009 Jan;4(1):133-7.
    Formulation study of tea tree oil patches.
    Minghetti P, Casiraghi A, Cilurzo F, Gambaro V, Montanari L.
    Source
    Istituto di Chimica Farmaceutica e Tossicologica P. Pratesi, Via Mangiagalli 14, 20133 Milano, Italy. paola.minghetti@unimi.it
    Abstract
    The antimicrobial, antifungal and anti-inflammatory properties of tea tree oil (TTO), the essential oil of Melaleuca alternifolia are well documented. In order to optimize its therapeutic activity, TTO patches were designed. The aim of this work was the formulation of monolayer patches containing TTO. Moreover, the performance of oleic acid (OA) as a skin penetration enhancer in patches was evaluated. Terpinen-4-ol (T4OL), the main component of TTO, was the marker used to evaluate TTO skin permeability. The permeation study was performed through human epidermis by using Franz diffusion cells. Patches were prepared by using methacrylic copolymers, Eudragit E100 (EuE100) or Eudragit NE (EuNE), and a silicone resin, BioPSA7-4602 (Bio-PSA). TTO and OA contents were fixed at 10% w/w and 3% w/w, respectively. The patches were prepared by a casting method and characterised in terms of T4OL content and skin permeability. All the selected polymers were suitable as the main component of the patch matrix. Since the main critical issue in the use of TTO is related to its toxicity after absorption, the local administration of TTO can take advantage of the use of patches based on EuE100 because of the high retained amount and the low permeation of T4OL. In this matrix, OA slightly increased the T4OL retained amount, improving the efficacy and safety of TTO patches.
    PMID: 19370891 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
     
  37. rmallia

    rmallia Member

    I have many more articles but would not rather bore you.
     
  38. rmallia

    rmallia Member

    Mycopathologia. 2013 Apr;175(3-4):281-6. doi: 10.1007/s11046-013-9622-7. Epub 2013 Feb 8.
    Antifungal activity of nanocapsule suspensions containing tea tree oil on the growth of Trichophyton rubrum.
    Flores FC, de Lima JA, Ribeiro RF, Alves SH, Rolim CM, Beck RC, da Silva CB.
    Source
    Programa de Pós-Graduação em Ciências Farmacêuticas, Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, Santa Maria, RS, Brazil.
    Abstract
    The aim of this study was to evaluate, for the first time, the antifungal efficacy of nanocapsules and nanoemulsions containing Melaleuca alternifolia essential oil (tea tree oil) in an onychomycosis model. The antifungal activity of nanostructured formulations was evaluated against Trichophyton rubrum in two different in vitro models of dermatophyte nail infection. First, nail powder was infected with T. rubrum in a 96-well plate and then treated with the formulations. After 7 and 14 days, cell viability was verified. The plate counts for the samples were 2.37, 1.45 and 1.0 log CFU mL(-1) (emulsion, nanoemulsion containing tea tree oil and nanocapsules containing tea tree oil, respectively). A second model employed nails fragments which were infected with the microorganism and treated with the formulations. The diameter of fungal colony was measured. The areas obtained were 2.88 ± 2.08 mm(2), 14.59 ± 2.01 mm(2), 40.98 ± 2.76 mm(2) and 38.72 ± 1.22 mm(2) for the nanocapsules containing tea tree oil, nanoemulsion containing tea tree oil, emulsion and untreated nail, respectively. Nail infection models demonstrated the ability of the formulations to reduce T. rubrum growth, with the inclusion of oil in nanocapsules being most efficient.
     
  39. Craig Payne

    Craig Payne Moderator

    Articles:
    6
    I can't believe anyone can say that this is evidence. They are anecdotes. A lot of anecdotes is NOT evidence. That is why controlled trials are done. All the controlled trials on tea tree oil for this show how useless it is. I will go with the evidence over a collection of anecdotes anytime.

    BTW - most of the refs posted above are lab based studies of properties; its the filed based clinical trials on fungal problems in the foot show it is no better than placebo.

    BTW, do you not see the major flaw in the analysis of the head lice study? They used a within groups analysis when they should have done a between groups analysis.

    I assume you missed the memo a while back that the European Economic Community were considering banning Tea Tree Oil?
     
  40. Head lice?

    Seriously?
     
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