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Korex versus EVA

Discussion in 'Biomechanics, Sports and Foot orthoses' started by markleigh, Apr 16, 2009.

  1. markleigh

    markleigh Active Member


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    I've always used EVA for forefoot extensions (Mortons/Reverse Mortons etc) but US Pods (maybe others) use Korex (in Kevin's Intracast books it seems the material of choice for these additions). Is there any reason why some use Korex over EVA? PS. Received Kevins Book 3 of newsletters yesterday & it again looks excellent.
     
  2. Mark:

    Hope you enjoy the book.

    I use Korex since it is durable, grinds easily and is readily available from my suppliers here in the States. I'm sure that there are many other materials, such as EVA, that would work well also for forefoot extensions.
     
  3. Jeff Root

    Jeff Root Well-Known Member

    EVA is more locally compressible and will tend to bottom out. I typically prefer Korex, especially when placing accommodations in a forefoot extension because the surrounding area doesn't compress like EVA, so the accommodation remains more effective in the long run.

    Respectfully,
    Jeff
    www.root-lab.com
     
  4. efuller

    efuller MVP

    I agree with Kevin and Jeff on the durability. I've also seen it called rubberized cork.

    Eric
     
  5. markleigh

    markleigh Active Member

    No brown-nosing but what a privelage to ask what might seem such a basic question & get three responses from such esteemed colleagues. I really appreciate your replies.
     
  6. Yeah, and the funny thing is that Eric lives about 75 miles from me and Jeff lives about 50 miles from me, in a country that is 3,000 miles wide.....but we only see each other at seminars!
     
  7. efuller

    efuller MVP

    Party at Kevin's Friday night?
     
  8. Jeff Root

    Jeff Root Well-Known Member

    Absolutely, he does live in the middle!:drinks:dizzy::D
     
  9. Grover

    Grover Member

    Get Kevin to sing Karaoke if you do get together.
    "Born to be Wild" would be an easy choice. :drinks

    P.S. I like Korex's function as well. I even find that cosmetically it has a nice look in the forefoot extension. Always a plus when I give patients a tour of their devices and explain why it may not look like their previous orthoses.

    Peter Grover Greaves D.Ch.
     
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