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Lower Limb Assessmet Score

Discussion in 'Biomechanics, Sports and Foot orthoses' started by Sammo, May 13, 2010.

  1. Sammo

    Sammo Active Member


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    Hi guys,

    Just wondering if anyone is using this score clinically for assessment of paeds patients?

    Joint hypermobility : The use of a new assessment tool to measure lower limb hypermobility
    Jill Ferrari, et al
    Clinical and experimental rheumatology Y. 2005, vol. 23, No. 3, pages 413-420

    I've started trying to incorporate it into my assessments of paeds to have a more objective measure of hypermobility in kids and something that is more relevant to my podiatry assessment than the Beightons score.

    Does anyone use any other scores?

    Also, does any one happen to have a copy of the paper I could have a glance at? Tried to buy online but it seems only hard copies are available and it'll take quite a while to get to me, plus I don't really trust the postal system.

    Many thanks,

    Sam
     
  2. Sam came across this PHD not sure if it helps ? Pages 27 they discuss the lower limb assessment score.
     

    Attached Files:

  3. RobinP

    RobinP Well-Known Member

    Interesting scale to score upon.

    In my opinion, scores 1, 4, 6 and 10 would all strike me as being fairly typical in a child. Therefore, there only needs to be a positive score in a further 3 out of 12 tests to be considered hypermobile. In addition, test 2 is not a great indicator as it would be more representative of ante or retroverted hips whether positive or negative

    What say you?

    Not sure whether the Beighton scale is any better as it is so heavily weighted for upper limb tests

    Robin
     
  4. Sally Smillie

    Sally Smillie Active Member

    I use it a lot. I started using it as one of the tests I use as a descriptor of the study population in research I am doing.

    Clinically, it is useful as it is not as subjective as us saying they are 'rather bendy', and far more specific than Beightons for lowe limb hypermobility. It is not a fault when you observe that some of the measures are typical of paeds. Using this measure, they have to score a minimum of 5 or more on each limb to indicate hypermobility.

    It is useful I feel as a describer, as mentioned above. It is not useful as an outcome measure, as while it will chave, it will be over a number of years, again, useful to qualify their degree of bendiness.

    It is very useful, but where approriately used for what it is.
     
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