Welcome to the Podiatry Arena forums

You are currently viewing our podiatry forum as a guest which gives you limited access to view all podiatry discussions and access our other features. By joining our free global community of Podiatrists and other interested foot health care professionals you will have access to post podiatry topics (answer and ask questions), communicate privately with other members, upload content, view attachments, receive a weekly email update of new discussions, access other special features. Registered users do not get displayed the advertisements in posted messages. Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please, join our global Podiatry community today!

  1. Its been a busy week moving to new domain and new server and new platform. We still have a lot to do. The basic functionality is there, but we working long hours on the rest and awaiting the new design.
    Dismiss Notice

Measuring vertical and medial-lateral mobility of the midfoot

Discussion in 'Biomechanics, Sports and Foot orthoses' started by JFAR, Mar 7, 2009.

  1. JFAR

    JFAR Well-Known Member


    Members do not see these Ads. Sign Up.
    Reliability and normative values for the foot mobility magnitude: a composite measure of vertical and medial-lateral mobility of the midfoot
    Thomas G McPoil, Bill Vicenzino, Mark W Cornwall, Natalie Collins, Meghan Warren

    Journal of Foot and Ankle Research 2009, 2:6 (6 March 2009)

    Background
    A study was conducted to determine the reliability and minimal detectable change for a new composite measure of the vertical and medial-lateral mobility of the midfoot called the foot mobility magnitude.

    Methods
    Three hundred and forty-five healthy participants volunteered to take part in the study. The change in dorsal arch height between weight bearing and non-weight bearing as well as the change in midfoot width between weight bearing and non-weight bearing were measured at 50% of total foot length and used to calculate the foot mobility magnitude. The reliability and minimal detectable change for the measurements were then determined based on the assessment of the measurements by three raters with different levels of clinical experience.

    Results

    The change in dorsal arch height between weight bearing and non-weight bearing, midfoot width between weight bearing and non-weight bearing, and the foot mobility magnitude were shown to have high levels of intra-rater and inter-rater reliability. Normative data are provided for the left and right feet of both the female (n=211) and male (n=134) subjects.

    Conclusions
    While the measurements of navicular drop and drift have been used as a clinical method to assess both the vertical and medial-lateral mobility of the midfoot, poor to fair levels of inter-rater reliability have been reported. The results of the current study suggest that the foot mobility magnitude provides the clinician and researcher with a highly reliable measure of vertical and medial-lateral midfoot mobility.
     
Loading...

Share This Page