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Mechanical model of the plantar fascia

Discussion in 'Biomechanics, Sports and Foot orthoses' started by NewsBot, Feb 24, 2010.

  1. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1

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    A constitutive model for the mechanical characterization of the plantar fascia.
    Natali AN, Pavan PG, Stecco C.
    Connect Tissue Res. 2010 Feb 22. [Epub ahead of print]
     
  2. Laetoliluna

    Laetoliluna Member

    This makes me wonder whether any-one has ever used CAD software (like Autodesk Inventor) to model the foot? You can specify the characteristics of the 'materials' you use in the 'design' then run stress tests on the finished product...
     
  3. Yes. You are referring to finite element modelling. Search google- "finite element foot" you get: http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&...s&q=finite element foot&aq=f&aqi=g10&aql=&oq=
     
  4. But before some one does a finite model of a tissue such as the plantar fascia maybe it might be important to decide once and for all if collagen fibers are present in the Plantar fascia or not, as I´m pretty sure it would affect the outcomes of the model. It seems the medical world can´t agree on if there is or is not.
     
  5. To do finite element modelling (FEM), you actually don't need to know what the material is made of. You only need to know it's load-deformation characteristics such as elastic modulus (i.e. Young's modulus) and it's three-dimensional shape.

    Since when is there any doubt that the plantar fascia is made of collagen?
     
  6. Laetoliluna

    Laetoliluna Member

    I've done some (very basic) mechical designs on Autodesk Inventor. The idea of having to work out ALL the parameters - tendons, ligaments, muscles, bones, cartilage, etc. is mind-blowing, considering no structure can be assessed in isolation. Even if we had all the data, it's only going to be an average. I'm no mathematician but the permutations of combinations of small strengths & weaknesses in all the various structures in an individual ...
     
  7. Laetoliluna

    Laetoliluna Member

    True but what would be better, would be for the students of the podiatry faculty to link up with those studying engineering design to do all the work... what do I pay my taxes for?
     
  8. :confused::confused: and people wonder why I get disappointed......
     
  9. Laetoliluna

    Laetoliluna Member

    Sorry Simon, I'm still working on it but I don't think it's a bad idea to utilise resources if they're there. I get disappointed when you see the time that's wasted at Uni's researching things that have been well & truly researched to death, why not suggest something new?
     
  10. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Deformation and stress distribution of the human foot after plantar ligaments release: A cadaveric study and finite element analysis.
    Liang J, Yang Y, Yu G, Niu W, Wang Y.
    Sci China Life Sci. 2011 Mar;54(3):267-71.
     
  11. CraigT

    CraigT Well-Known Member

    Kevin- Here is a good study to add to your '10 functions of the plantar fascia' references....
     
  12. Does anyone have a full PDF I would love well even more than love a copy, Please, pretty please - well you get the idea.
     
  13. Craig:

    Here is the original newsletter that I wrote about 16 years ago that predicted this paper's findings.

     
  14. Laetoliluna

    Laetoliluna Member

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