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Metatarsalgia

Discussion in 'Biomechanics, Sports and Foot orthoses' started by falconegian, Jan 14, 2008.

  1. falconegian

    falconegian Active Member


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    I would like to know which options do you usually have for metatarsalgia!
    Do you belive in metatarsal pads? Which size and shape? whish material? which height?
     
  2. DaVinci

    DaVinci Well-Known Member

    What do you mean by metatarsalgia? Metatarsalgia simply means pain in the metatarsal region and can be due to 100's of different causes, each of which will need a different treatment approach.
     
  3. falconegian

    falconegian Active Member

    I agree with your concer about the diagnosis. It is absolutely true that different causes are related to metatarsalgia. Anyway in my brief experience, I think that also a correct diagnosis is difficult to do and there are often different sources of pain at the some time. If there is an overloading of the metatarsl heads, this causes an inflammatori reaction that involves the FT, bursae and nerves I suppose. Considering that you need to correct the cause of overloading, how do you treatthe symptom of metatarsal pain ?
     
  4. It depends on the cause of the overloading.

    I don't really understand your question here. As you say there are many different pathologies affecting different structures occasioned by different mechanical forces. You treat the symptom of metatarsal pain by identifying the causative trauma and seeking to attenuate it, or, in some cases if the problem has become structural and entrenched beyond the ability of orthotics to control, you consider the surgical route.

    Regards
    Robert
     
  5. Sometimes the area is so inflammed it is hard to assess the true cause/s of Metatarsalgia. Start by getting the inflammation down, get the patient into trainers for a while and reasses after a period of time, (time to be agreed by you and patient). Work from the basics and then look into biomech. work stresses, footwear etc. Easing the pain is always the patients first priority and if it lessens they will be much more compliant.

    Regards

    Stephanie
     
  6. Ella Hurrell

    Ella Hurrell Active Member

    I don't really understand your question here. As you say there are many different pathologies affecting different structures occasioned by different mechanical forces. You treat the symptom of metatarsal pain by identifying the causative trauma and seeking to attenuate it, or, in some cases if the problem has become structural and entrenched beyond the ability of orthotics to control, you consider the surgical route.

    Regards
    Robert[/QUOTE]

    I agree with Robert - Metatarsalgia is a particularly wooly discription. :bang:

    I would always try and identify the structure giving the symptoms and the underlying cause of the pain in order to provide the correct treatment. Otherwise, it's like putting a band aid on a 6" ulcer!
     
  7. drsarbes

    drsarbes Well-Known Member

    Falcon:
    You really need a proper diagnosis before you can choose a proper treatment.
    For instance; If you have a pain in the 2nd MTPJ secondary to an Osteochondral fracture the treatment would be quite different than a pain in the 2nd MTPJ due to mechanical tenosynovitis.
    You CAN call both metatarsalgia.

    Steve
     
  8. falconegian

    falconegian Active Member

    I agree with all of you. Maybe my quastion was not clear. My aim was to know your experience in using metatarsal pads. I wanted to know the technical aspects regarding shape, size, material and height.

    GIanluca
     
  9. zaffie

    zaffie Active Member

    Falcon

    It depends on what you are trying to achieve with metatarsal pads. Which brings it back to previous posts you have to have a diagnosis first.:empathy:

    Once you have a diagnosis padding is only one option of many.

    Padding materials come in all sorts of thicknesses and densities. You have open celled, closed celled ,semi compressed ,compressed ,soft. Don't forget taping products that can be effective. rigid, semi rigid stretch etc

    Shape and size depends on what you are trying to do/alleviate.

    If you are more specific in your question I am sure others with a great deal more knowledge than me will answer you
     
  10. Admin2

    Admin2 Administrator Staff Member

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