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Molluscum Contagiosum

Discussion in 'Pediatrics' started by Evan, Aug 14, 2009.

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  1. Evan

    Evan Welcome New Poster


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    Can Moluscum Contagiosum exist on the plantar surface of the feet? I have just seen a 9 year old girl with MC, with a small lesion under her 2nd MPJ, that doesn't look like a VP.
     
  2. posalafin

    posalafin Active Member

    Re: Moluscum Contagiosum

    Yes you can but it is an unusual site for the lesions to occur. Does she have lesions elsewhere on her body that look similar? If so it is more likely to be molluscum contagiosum, however if it is only one isolated lesion on the plantar foot then I would think it unlikely to be molluscum contagiosum.

    Regards,

    David Kelly
     
  3. Evan

    Evan Welcome New Poster

    Re: Moluscum Contagiosum

    Thanks for reply, there are lesions on her back and arms, but they look different because she isnt standing on them.
     
  4. admin

    admin Administrator Staff Member

    Molluscum contagiosum

    Molluscum contagiosum (MC), sometimes called water warts, is a viral infection of the skin that results in small raised pink lesions with a dimple in the center.[1] They may become itchy or sore, and occur singularly or in groups.[1] Any area of the skin may be affected, with abdomen, legs, arms, neck, genital area, and face being the most common.[1] Onset of the lesions is around seven weeks after infection.[3] They usually go away within a year without scarring.[1]

    The infection is caused by a poxvirus called the molluscum contagiosum virus (MCV).[1] The virus is spread either by direct contact, including sexual activity, or via contaminated objects such as towels.[4] The condition can also be spread to other areas of the body by the person themselves.[4] Risk factors include a weak immune system, atopic dermatitis, and crowded living conditions.[2] Following one infection, it is possible to get re-infected.[9] Diagnosis is typically based on the appearance of the lesions.[3]

    Prevention includes hand washing and not sharing personal items.[6] While treatment is not necessary, some may wish to have the lesions removed for cosmetic reasons or to prevent spread.[7] Removal may occur with freezing, laser therapy, or opening up the lesion and scraping the inside.[7] Scraping the lesion can, however, result in scarring.[9] The oral medication cimetidine, or podophyllotoxin cream applied to the skin, may also be used for treatment.[7]

    Approximately 122 million people globally were affected by molluscum contagiosum as of 2010 (1.8% of the population).[8] It is more common in children between the ages of one and ten years old.[2] The condition has become more common in the United States since 1966.[2] But having an infection is not a reason to keep a child out of school or daycare.[10]

    1. ^ a b c d e f g "Molluscum Contagiosum". www.cdc.gov. 11 May 2015. Archived from the original on 16 June 2017. Retrieved 10 June 2017.
    2. ^ a b c d e "Risk Factors | Molluscum Contagiosum". www.cdc.gov. 11 May 2015. Archived from the original on 10 June 2017. Retrieved 10 June 2017.
    3. ^ a b c d Ramdass, P; Mullick, S; Farber, HF (December 2015). "Viral Skin Diseases". Primary Care (Review). 42 (4): 517–67. doi:10.1016/j.pop.2015.08.006. PMID 26612372.
    4. ^ a b c "Transmission | Molluscum Contagiosum". www.cdc.gov. 11 May 2015. Archived from the original on 10 June 2017. Retrieved 10 June 2017.
    5. ^ Ferri, Fred F. (2010). Ferri's differential diagnosis : a practical guide to the differential diagnosis of symptoms, signs, and clinical disorders (2nd ed.). Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier/Mosby. p. Chapter M. ISBN 978-0323076999.
    6. ^ a b "Prevention | Molluscum Contagiosum". www.cdc.gov. 11 May 2015. Archived from the original on 17 June 2017. Retrieved 10 June 2017.
    7. ^ a b c d e "Treatment Options | Molluscum Contagiosum". www.cdc.gov. 11 May 2015. Archived from the original on 17 June 2017. Retrieved 10 June 2017.
    8. ^ a b Vos, Theo; Flaxman, D; Naghavi, A; et al. (December 2012). "Years lived with disability (YLDs) for 1160 sequelae of 289 diseases and injuries 1990-2010: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2010". Lancet. 380 (9859): 2163–96. doi:10.1016/S0140-6736(12)61729-2. PMC 6350784. PMID 23245607.
    9. ^ a b "Long Term Effects | Molluscum Contagiosum". www.cdc.gov. 11 May 2015. Archived from the original on 17 June 2017. Retrieved 10 June 2017.
    10. ^ "Day Care Centers and Schools | Molluscum Contagiosum". www.cdc.gov. 11 May 2015. Archived from the original on 17 June 2017. Retrieved 10 June 2017.
     
  5. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
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    Plantar molluscum contagiosum: a case report of molluscum contagiosum occurring on the sole of the foot and a review of the world literature.
    Cohen PR, Tschen JA.
    Cutis. 2012 Jul;90(1):35-41.
     
  6. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
  7. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Molluscum Contagiosum on the Sole of the Foot in an Elderly Patient: A Case Report
    Lee Firestone et al
    Am J Case Rep. 2020 Sep 17;21:e923777
     

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