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New York Times: The Road to Success, Paved With Bad Advice

Discussion in 'Biomechanics, Sports and Foot orthoses' started by LuckyLisfranc, May 29, 2009.

  1. LuckyLisfranc

    LuckyLisfranc Well-Known Member


    Members do not see these Ads. Sign Up.
    Interesting read...

     
  2. B. Englund

    B. Englund Active Member

    Trying to change the way people run tend to lead to more harm than good I belive. As a runner and elite triathlete (aside being a Podiatrist) I often have people asking me to analyse the way they run and asking for tips for improvements. I usually recommend them to, besides from just running, also do gym-workouts. If not any obvious and huge deviations present I wont intervene with their running-technique. With training more efficient stride-technique usually occurs.
    Striving for heel-first running-style in order to prevent injuries doesn’t make any sense to me, however you cant either recommend a average “15-20 miles-a-week-runner” to start running with mid-foot or fore-foot strike since they probably not have enough strength and endurance to do so.
    Using personal experiences is certainly not the way to go, look at 10 000m race, or the running-leg of a triathlete race, you will see elite athletes with huge variations in running-technique.

    Tomorrow I will run the Stockholm Marathon, as a mid-foot striker, hope I wont get injured…:dizzy:

    Cheers

    Björn Englund
    Podiatrist
    Stockholm, Sweden
     
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