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OESH Shoes

Discussion in 'Biomechanics, Sports and Foot orthoses' started by scotfoot, Feb 22, 2017.

  1. scotfoot

    scotfoot Active Member


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    With regard to the design of Dr Kerrigans shoes in general (and especially this design -http://oeshshoes.com/product/athena-sandal-virginian/ ) I believe this type of shoe ,when used over time , may allow progressive strengthening of the muscles of the fore foot , in a manner not to dissimilar than that laid out in the extract below ( 1) .
    One might also speculate that toes , allowed to move in a more natural manner when subject to torsional loads ,may produce afferents that better allow the control of angular momentum and the torsional loads in the more proximal joints .

    Gerry

    EXTRACT (1) ---- From Biomch-l post of mine

    "You might be interested in the following .It relates to grip ,torque ,flat rigid surfaces and the unshod condition.

    First I found myself a suitable surface such as linoleum . Next I took off my shoes and socks and stood next to a wall for support . Then , taking most of my weight initially on the right foot which was kept flat on the ground ,I put my left foot into toe off position so that only the ball of the foot and the toes were in contact with the ground . Then I carefully transferred some weight onto the left foot and finally,with the ball of the foot and toes under some pressure , rotated the foot outwards producing torque . I found that the toes played an important part in resisting the outward rotation and that they also began to become spaced out from each other possibly engaging the adductors .( please note that I am not suggesting that anyone copy the above exercise sequence or injury may result )
    So perhaps the toes can significantly aid grip on a flat rigid surface ?"
     
  2. scotfoot

    scotfoot Active Member

    Just to expand on the above a little , the OESH design strikes me as good not only because it provides a relatively broad , flat , forefoot area allowing more natural function in this area than other types of shoe ,but also because it provides a spring like cushioning action absent when a person runs barefoot on concrete .

    Some highly respected authorities have suggested that it may be possible to transition from shod to unshod running on concrete pavements by a gradual approach but I have doubts that the unshod human foot can ever really be conditioned to perform well this type of surface . This is because of the nature of foots natural cushioning system ,the plantar fat pads .

    These are located at the ball of the foot and the heel and have evolved over many thousands of years for cushioning impacts during running and walking on natural , yielding substrates such as sand or even hard packed earth overlying softer soil , many meters deep .

    I believe that if the size and composition of the fat pads cannot be changed during a shod to barefoot transition period ,then, at least as far as running on concrete is concerned a fully satisfactory transition can never be achieved .

    With regard to the above ,and in my opinion ,the OESH design might well offer advantages over other types of shoe especially with regard to movement on unforgiving substrates .

    Gerry
     
  3. scotfoot

    scotfoot Active Member

    1. "First I found myself a suitable surface such as linoleum . Next I took off my shoes and socks and stood next to a wall for support . Then , taking most of my weight initially on the right foot which was kept flat on the ground ,I put my left foot into toe off position so that only the ball of the foot and the toes were in contact with the ground . Then I carefully transferred some weight onto the left foot and finally,with the ball of the foot and toes under some pressure , rotated the foot outwards producing torque . I found that the toes played an important part in resisting the outward rotation and that they also began to become spaced out from each other possibly engaging the adductors .( please note that I am not suggesting that anyone copy the above exercise sequence or injury may result )
      So perhaps the toes can significantly aid grip on a flat rigid surface ? "

      A final point related to the above quote , taken from my first post , might be of interest .

      Several studies have looked at the control of angular momentum through the coordination of body segment movement during walking . I feel that it is likely that in the unshod condition ,where walking or running produces excessive torque , the subsequent outward rotation of the foot will necessitate increased eccentric activity in the toe adductors , such as the transverse head of the adductor hallucis , to control toe separation . It is also plausible that stretch receptors in these muscles will send proprioceptive afferents which might then help produce adjustments to body segment movements ,such as arm swing , to counterbalance the torque being produced in the leg and foot and so produce more efficient movement with less internal , torque related , joint strain .

      Gerry​
     
  4. scotfoot

    scotfoot Active Member

    Further to the above posts I have a question for Dr Kerrigan .
    The question is whether or not the toe box design of OESH shoes will allow dorsiflexion of the toes during walking/running . The question is asked in relation to the following thread on Biomch-l (below) and if the answer is yes then I feel the OESH shoe , coupled with appropriate , professionally guided , rehabilitation of the initial phase of the windlass mechanism , might be of assistance in overcoming a number of chronic foot and lower leg conditions .
    Gerry
    Windlass mechanisms - plural - and diabetes - Biomch-L

    https://biomch-l.isbweb.org/threads/31054-Windlass-mechanisms-plural-and-diabetes
    2 Mar 2018 - 3 posts - ‎1 author
    These are extracts from a thread I have posted on Podiatry Arena . Any comments welcome . Post 1 So during the gait cycle the windlass mechanism is engaged and reversed twice . Going from heel strike to heel strike we have windlass , reverse windlass , windlass and then reverse windlass at toe off .
     
  5. scotfoot

    scotfoot Active Member

    So if a clinician felt that re- booting the initial phase of the windlass mechanism may help treat some musculo skeletal problems encountered in the foot and lower leg , they would need to look both at footwear and foot re-education / strengthening . For a number of reasons the OESH shoe fits the bill on the footwear side of things if there is ample space for the toe extensors to dorsiflex the toes without resistance from the shoe .

    So what about foot /toe re-education ? A bit trickier but , in my opinion , strengthening of the toe dorsilflexors /plantarflexors should focus on movement around the MTFJ and not on toe clawing or the equally unnatural short foot exercise . Mickle's band exercise regime for the toe flexors could be used for both plantar flexors and dorsilfexors .

    Not my place to say but wouldn't it be handy if Casey knew Irene and Irene knew Karen :)
     
  6. scotfoot

    scotfoot Active Member

    Many occupations involve standing in one place over a long period of time . For example assembly line workers , theater nurses, surgeons and the like .

    However , standing still is actually a lot more dynamic than many might imagine with constant weight shifting occurring between the feet over time . This causes constant fluctuations in the stresses to which the plantar fascia is subjected which over time may lead to pathological changes . A properly functioning "initial windlass mechanism " will likely reduce the rate of loading of the plantar tissues and therefore the cumulative stresses to which the plantar fascia is subjected , thus reducing the risk of plantar fasciitis .

    I wonder if OESH shoes have thought of producing a closed toe , autoclavable version of their shoe? Could be a big hit since the major design features are already there .
     
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