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Orthotic control of rear foot in chronic Achilles tendon injury

Discussion in 'Biomechanics, Sports and Foot orthoses' started by NewsBot, Jul 10, 2008.

  1. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1

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    Orthotic control of rear foot and lower limb motion during running in participants with chronic Achilles tendon injury.
    Donoghue OA, Harrison AJ, Laxton P, Jones RK.
    Sports Biomech. 2008 May;7(2):194-205
     
  2. Admin2

    Admin2 Administrator Staff Member

  3. Craig Payne

    Craig Payne Moderator

    Articles:
    6
    I just love this stuff:
     
  4. Secret Squirrel

    Secret Squirrel Active Member

    How did the orthotics help if they pronated the foot more?
     
  5. PodAus

    PodAus Active Member

    Because it's not all about linear kinematics...

    :butcher:
     
  6. Kent

    Kent Active Member

    But really, 92% relief of symptoms with orthotics?????:pigs:

    I'd like to see a high quality RCT before I stop prescribing eccentric loading exercises and start giving all my Achilles patients orthotics.
     
  7. PodAus

    PodAus Active Member

    Who says they're mutually exclusive?
     
  8. Craig Payne

    Craig Payne Moderator

    Articles:
    6
    You need to come to one of the Boot Camps!

    Think about it intuitivly ... what is the function of the muscles that pull on the achilles tendon? .... supinate and plantarflex the foot .... so if an orthotic is going to help, then it has to reduce the force in the tissues; ... ie it has to reduce the pronatory moments and the dorsiflexion moments .... it does not matter what it does to the motion ....its matters what it does to the forces
    The 92% reduction in symptoms was not compared to a control group without orthotics, so any conclusion has to be tempered with that.
     
  9. PodAus

    PodAus Active Member

    yep :santa:
     
  10. Stanley

    Stanley Well-Known Member

    These had to be special orthoses equipped with pronation boosters. :rolleyes:
    Pronation allows more dorsiflexion to occur in the midtarsal joint, so it would seem that we shouldn't make good orthoses for Achilles tendontitis.
     
  11. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Kinematic Analysis of Runners with Achilles Mid-Portion Tendinopathy -
    Michael Ryan, Stefan Grau, Inga Krauss, Christian Maiwald, Jack Taunton
    Foot & Ankle International December 2009 (Vol. 30 #12)
     
  12. Anecdotally, those runners with pronated feet and Achilles tendinitis/tendinosis who don't initially respond to heel lifts, stretching and icing seem to respond quite well to anti-pronation foot orthoses. My assumption has always been that the orthosis must decrease the tensile stress on the injured/torn area of the Achilles tendon and therefore allows the pain to gradually resolve or the Achilles tendon to heal. However, we still have no research yet, to my knowledge, that confirms this idea.
     
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