Welcome to the Podiatry Arena forums

You are currently viewing our podiatry forum as a guest which gives you limited access to view all podiatry discussions and access our other features. By joining our free global community of Podiatrists and other interested foot health care professionals you will have access to post podiatry topics (answer and ask questions), communicate privately with other members, upload content, view attachments, receive a weekly email update of new discussions, access other special features. Registered users do not get displayed the advertisements in posted messages. Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please, join our global Podiatry community today!

  1. Everything that you are ever going to want to know about running shoes: Running Shoes Boot Camp Online, for taking it to the next level? See here for more.
    Dismiss Notice
  2. Have you considered the Critical Thinking and Skeptical Boot Camp, for taking it to the next level? See here for more.
    Dismiss Notice
  3. Have you considered the Clinical Biomechanics Boot Camp Online, for taking it to the next level? See here for more.
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Have you considered the Clinical Biomechanics Boot Camp Online, for taking it to the next level? See here for more.
Dismiss Notice
Have you liked us on Facebook to get our updates? Please do. Click here for our Facebook page.
Dismiss Notice
Do you get the weekly newsletter that Podiatry Arena sends out to update everybody? If not, click here to organise this.

Orthotic Intervention for metatarsal relief

Discussion in 'Biomechanics, Sports and Foot orthoses' started by LER, Feb 2, 2011.

  1. LER

    LER Active Member

  2. Why is a so called scientific journal still allowing the term metatarsalgia to be used ?

    About a useful term as pain in the ball of the foot.
     
  3. davidh

    davidh Podiatry Arena Veteran

    Welcome to the forum:drinks.

    Michael, it's not really a scientific journal, and while we don't use a generic term like metatarsalgia much, other professions do, so that's not a problem in my book.

    The article in question is useful from a Podiatry Profession marketing point of view. It can be read by a range of health professionals and does not need degree-level education to understand the points made.

    I liked it.
     
  4. David Singleton

    David Singleton Active Member

    :good:
    Well said that man!:good:
     
  5. alright I´ll bite.

    So if the article said ´overpronation´it would be ok as well cause it´s used by other professions.

    The article was written by a Podiatrist - if said Podiatrist had of said metatarsalgia is a term that has been used to describe pain in the forefoot, but is such a broad term that does not describe the true nature of symptoms or even place of pain and thus should not be used.

    Then went on to discuss some of the causes of forefoot pain in the metatarsal region,diagnosis and treatment with orthotics, it would have been a much better article.

    Using a crap term just continues the cycle of crap term.

    or is ok to say that your metatarsalgia has come from the collapse of your front foot arch and overpronation.

    all crap, it´s time we stop dumbing down things and use our knowledge to educate.

    Rant over,

    maybe
     
  6. David Singleton

    David Singleton Active Member

    My point is, are we never allowed to be generic? Until we have a diagnosis why cant we use an umbrella term such as Metatarsalgia?
     
  7. Yes of course we can be generic, but the paper was about treatment of metatarsalgia, so if we are going to treat might help to have a better diagnosis than inflammation and pain in the forefoot = metatarsalgia I would have thought.

    I don´t personally think it a good idea even when talking to patients, or other medial practitioners.
     
Loading...

Share This Page