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Pes Cavus and Scoliosis

Discussion in 'Biomechanics, Sports and Foot orthoses' started by NewsBot, Sep 24, 2013.

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  1. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1

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    Pes cavus and idiopathic scoliosis from school screening
    Hanene Belabbassi, Assia Haddouche, Abdelkader Ouadah and Houria Kaced
    Scoliosis 2013, 8(Suppl 2):O6
     
  2. Admin2

    Admin2 Administrator Staff Member

  3. Brian A. Rothbart

    Brian A. Rothbart Active Member

    Recenly I concluded and published a study linking abnormal pronation patterns to abnormal frontal plane deviations in the thoracic spine: (n=25, 10-18 YOs)

    Inclusion Criteria:

    All subjects diagnosed as Ideopathic Scoliosis
    All subjects have thoracic curves

    Procedure: The following null hypothesis was constructed and tested using the One Sample t-Test (Analyse-it + General, version 1.73) on the raw date.

    Hoa: There is no relationship between the most pronated foot and the direction of the thoracic curve

    Results: One-tailed P value = 0.0415

    Conclusion: At confidence level = 99%, the null hypothesis Hoa was rejected

    Discussion:

    If the abnormal (gravity drive) pronation pattern was Rt > Lf, I found a right thoracic curve.
    If the abnormal pronation pattern was Lf > Rt, I found a left thoracic curve.

    However, not all gravity driven pronators develop scoliotic curves (thoracic). The development of scoliosis appears to be a multifactorial event, abnormal pronation being one of the determinants.

    Professor Rothbart

    Rothbart BA 2013. Preliminary Study: Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis Linked to Abnormal Foot Pronation. Podiatry Review
    Vol 72, No 2:8-11.
     
  4. Orthican

    Orthican Active Member

    "If the abnormal (gravity drive) pronation pattern was Rt > Lf, I found a right thoracic curve.
    If the abnormal pronation pattern was Lf > Rt, I found a left thoracic curve.
    The development of scoliosis appears to be a multifactorial event, abnormal pronation being one of the determinants."

    Correlation does not imply causation.
     
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