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Recurrence Following Proximal Medial Opening Wedge Osteotomy for Correction of Moderate Hallux Valgu

Discussion in 'Foot Surgery' started by NewsBot, Mar 17, 2015.

  1. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

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    High Rate of Recurrence Following Proximal Medial Opening Wedge Osteotomy for Correction of Moderate Hallux Valgus
    Sravisht Iyer, Constantine A. Demetracopoulos, Carolyn M. Sofka, Scott J. Ellis
    Foot & Ankle International March 16, 2015
     
  2. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

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    First Metatarsal Proximal Opening Wedge Osteotomy for Correction of Hallux Valgus Deformity: Comparison of Straight versus Oblique Osteotomy.
    Han SH et al
    Yonsei Med J. 2015 May 1;56(3):744-52. doi: 10.3349/ymj.2015.56.3.744.
     
  3. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

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    Recurrence of Hallux Valgus Can Be Predicted from Immediate Postoperative Non-Weight-Bearing Radiographs.
    Park CH, Lee WC.
    J Bone Joint Surg Am. 2017 Jul 19;99(14):1190-1197. doi: 10.2106/JBJS.16.00980.
     
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    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

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    PUBLIC RELEASE: 24-JUL-2017
    After bunion surgery, immediate x-rays predict recurrence risk

    July 24, 2017 - For patients undergoing surgery to repair a bunion deformity of the foot, non-weight-bearing x rays taken immediately after surgery can provide a good estimate of the risk that the bunion will return over time, reports a study in the current issue of The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery. The journal is published in partnership with Wolters Kluwer.

    Recurrence of bunions can be "reliably predicted" from a few simple measurements on postoperative x rays, according to the new research by South Korean investigators Chul Hyun Park, MD, PhD, of Yeungnam University Medical Center and Woo-Chun Lee, MD, PhD, of Injie University Seoul Paik Hospital. They believe that, with further study, using the same x-ray predictors during surgery might help to minimize recurrence risk.

    Simple X-Ray Measurements Strongly Liked to Bunion Recurrence

    Bunions--the medical term is "hallux valgus"--are a common foot deformity. They appear as a bump on the side of the foot, caused by misalignment of the big toe and the long bone (first metatarsal bone) connecting it to the ankle. When bunions become severe, painful, or interfere with walking, surgery can be performed to realign the bones.

    Unfortunately, for many patients, bunions gradually return after surgery--previous studies have reported recurrence rates of up to 25 percent. Drs. Park and Lee sought to determine whether measurements made on routine "non-weight-bearing" x rays immediately after surgery could predict the risk of recurrence in the months after the procedure.

    The study included 93 patients undergoing bunion surgery on 117 feet. All but two patients were women, reflecting the fact that bunions are commonly caused by tight, confining shoes.

    At an average follow-up of two years, the bunion recurrence rate was 17 percent. Recurrence was defined as a hallux valgus angle (HVA)--the angle formed by the toe bone and first metatarsal bone--of 20 degrees or greater.

    Patients with larger preoperative and postoperative HVAs were at higher risk of recurrence. Bunions were 28 times more likely to recur when the postoperative HVA was eight degrees or larger than when the HVA was less than eight degrees. The HVA continued to widen over time in patients with recurrent bunions, but stabilized at six months in those without recurrence.

    "The recurrence of hallux valgus is one of the most important complications after surgery because it is closely related to patient satisfaction," the researchers write. While previous studies have focused on one or two risk factors for recurrent bunions, the new study evaluated the effects of multiple factors. Other factors associated with increased recurrence risk included severe bunions with a preoperative HVA of 40 degrees or larger and the position of a pair of small bones (sesamoids) under the joint on postoperative x rays.

    If future studies confirm their results, Drs. Park and Lee believe that radiographs taken during surgery might help develop guidelines for "satisfactory correction" of bunions--in particular, ensuring that surgery corrects the HVA to eight degrees or less.
     
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    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

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    Recurrent Hallux Valgus
    15 Year Single Surgeon Series

    David Beck, MD, Steven Raikin, MD, Andrew Park, MD
    Foot & Ankle Orthopaedics September 18, 2017
     
  6. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Is Generalized Ligamentous Laxity a Prognostic Factor for Recurred Hallux Valgus Deformity?
    Byung-Ki Cho et al
    Foot and Ankle Surgery; 13 October 2017
     
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