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Risk factors for exercise-related lower leg pain

Discussion in 'Biomechanics, Sports and Foot orthoses' started by Hylton Menz, Nov 29, 2005.

  1. Hylton Menz

    Hylton Menz Guest


    Members do not see these Ads. Sign Up.
    Excellent study just published in Gait and Posture:

    A prospective study of gait related risk factors for exercise-related lower leg pain

    T.M. Willems, D. De Clercq, K. Delbaere, G. Vanderstraeten, A. De Cock and E. Witvrouw

    Abstract

    The purpose of this study was to determine prospectively gait related risk factors for exercise-related lower leg pain (ERLLP) in 400 physical education students. Static lower leg alignment was determined, and 3D gait kinematics combined with plantar pressure profiles were collected. After this evaluation, all sports injuries were registered by the same sports physician during the duration of the study. Forty six subjects developed ERLLP and 29 of them developed bilateral symptoms thus giving 75 symptomatic lower legs. Bilateral lower legs of 167 subjects who developed no injuries in the lower extremities served as controls. Cox regression analysis revealed that subjects who developed ERLLP had an altered running pattern before the injury compared to the controls and included (1) a significantly more central heel-strike, (2) a significantly increased pronation, accompanied with more pressure underneath the medial side of the foot, and (3) a significantly more lateral roll-off. These findings suggest that altered biomechanics play a role in the genesis of ERLLP and thus should be considered in prevention and rehabilitation.​

    link
     
  2. Craig Payne

    Craig Payne Moderator

    Articles:
    8
    They got the Nike award at Cleveland ISB conference for that work.
     
  3. Admin2

    Admin2 Administrator Staff Member

    Here is another related paper that was just published:

    Intrinsic factors associated with exercise-related leg pain in collegiate cross-country runners.
    Clin J Sport Med. 2006 Jan;16(1):10-14.
     
  4. Craig Payne

    Craig Payne Moderator

    Articles:
    8
    Here is a challenge for any students reading this...

    Look at the abstracts for the two studies above...what is the fundamental methodological design difference between them that substantially weakens the conclusions from one of them? (PS - its not sample size)
     
    Last edited: Jan 9, 2006
  5. Lin

    Lin Welcome New Poster

    One is prospective and the other is cross sectional. You can't imply causation from a cross sectional study.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Feb 1, 2006
  6. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Another one from the same authors:

    Gait-Related Risk Factors for Exercise-Related Lower-Leg Pain during Shod Running.
    Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2007 Feb;39(2):330-9
    Willems TM, Witvrouw E, DE Cock A, DE Clercq D
     
  7. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Exercise-Related Leg Pain in Collegiate Cross-Country Athletes: Extrinsic and Intrinsic Risk Factors.
    Reinking MF, Austin TM, Hayes AM.
    J Orthop Sports Phys Ther. 2007;37(11):670-678.
     
  8. Peter1234

    Peter1234 Active Member

    Hi Hylton Menz,

    the study seems good to me (Willems et al), however is it correct to attribute a group as a control after finding the pathologies? is that still considered randomised?
     
  9. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Risk factors for self-reported exercise-related leg pain in high school cross-country athletes.
    Reinking MF, Austin TM, Hayes AM.
    J Athl Train. 2010 Jan-Feb;45(1):51-7.
     
  10. Griff

    Griff Moderator

    Anyone know what model of foot type classification they used?
     
  11. Griff

    Griff Moderator

    Nevermind I found it - the Journal of Athletic Training is free/open access.

    I've attached it for those interested

    Ian
     

    Attached Files:

  12. stickleyc

    stickleyc Active Member

    I used the Willems articles pretty extensively for my dissertation and if I remember correctly I'm pretty sure that they pooled their left and right foot results from subjects including using bilateral "injured" feet as 2 separate incidences. That obviously has some problems. But as my advisor always said "there are NO perfect studies.."

    Still 2 good articles and I applaud their efforts - I did a prospective study for my dissertation with a much smaller sample than they did and I know how flippin' hard it is to keep track of people over a time course.
     
  13. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    The relationship between isotonic plantar flexor endurance, navicular drop, and exercise-related leg pain in a cohort of collegiate cross-country runners.
    Bennett JE, Reinking MF, Rauh MJ.
    Int J Sports Phys Ther. 2012 Jun;7(3):267-78.
     
  14. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Incidence and risk factors for medial tibial stress syndrome and tibial stress fracture in high school runners.
    Yagi S, Muneta T, Sekiya I.
    Knee Surg Sports Traumatol Arthrosc. 2012 Aug 9.

     
  15. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    A SURVEY OF EXERCISE‐RELATED LEG PAIN IN COMMUNITY RUNNERS
    Mark F. Reinking, PT, PhD, SCS, ATC, Tricia M. Austin, PT, PhD, ATC, and Ann M. Hayes, PT, DPT, OCS
    Int J Sports Phys Ther. 2013 June; 8(3): 269–276.
     
  16. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Intrinsic factors associated with medial tibial stress syndrome in athletes: A large case-control study
    M Winters; H Veldt; E W Bakker; M H Moen
    S Afr J SM 2013;25(3):63-67. DOI:10.7196/SAJSM.376
     
  17. Craig Payne

    Craig Payne Moderator

    Articles:
    8
    http://www.runresearchjunkie.com/risk-factors-for-medial-tibial-stress-syndrome/
     
  18. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Risk factors associated with medial tibial stress syndrome in runners: a systematic review and meta-analysis
    Newman P, Witchalls J, Waddington G, Adams R
    Open Access Journal of Sports Medicine 2013, 4:229-241
     
  19. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Risk Factors for Tibial Stress Injuries: A Case-Control Study.
    Beck, Belinda R. PhD; Rudolph, Katrin MD; Matheson, Gordon O. MD, PhD; Bergman, A. Gabrielle MD, PhD; Norling, Tracey L. BHS(HM), BN
    Clinical Journal of Sport Medicine: June 20, 2014
     
  20. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
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    Risk factors for medial tibial stress syndrome in physically active individuals such as runners and military personnel: a systematic review and meta-analysis
    Karrie L Hamstra-Wright, Kellie C Huxel Bliven, Curt Bay
    Br J Sports Med; Online First
     
  21. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
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    The relationship between Shin Splints with anthropometric characteristics and some indicators of body composition.
    Sabeti V, Khoshraftar Yazdi N, Bizheh N.
    J Sports Med Phys Fitness. 2014 Oct 6
     
  22. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
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    Studying the Relation Between Medial Tibial Stress Syndrome and Anatomic and Anthropometric Characteristics of Military Male Personnel
    Vahid Sobhani et al
    Asian Journal of Sports Medicine. 2015 March; 6(2): e23811
     
  23. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Intrinsic and Extrinsic Factors Associated with Medial Tibial Stress
    Syndrome in Division III College Female Track Athletes

    Marissa Basar, Lauren Aulick, Joan Rocks, Ph.D, ATC, AT, Angelo Lamatrice, PT, MPT, ATC, AT, and Shelley Payne, DHS, PT, ATC, AT
    Journal of Sports Medicine and Allied Health Sciences: Official Journal of the Ohio Athletic Trainers Association; Volume 1; Issue 1 O
     
  24. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
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    Exercise-related leg pain and risk factors in inter university distance runners.
    Chaudhary S, Bellam MB, Shenoy S.
    Saudi J Sports Med 2016;16:32-40
     
  25. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
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    Conceptualisation of a region-based group of musculoskeletal pain conditions as ‘tibial loading pain’ and systematic review of effects of load-modifying interventions
    Thorlene Egerton et al
    July 20, 2021
     
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