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Sensori-motor reflex arcs

Discussion in 'Biomechanics, Sports and Foot orthoses' started by timharmey, Jan 18, 2012.

  1. timharmey

    timharmey Active Member


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    What effect would orthotics have on sensori-motor reflex arcs and could they play a role in orthotic function ?
    Tim
     
  2. Possibly Tim

    if this is a good definition - Reflex arcs. A reflex arc is a neural circuit that creates a more or less automatic link between a sensory input and a specific motor output

    then I would suggest you read this thread - Leg stiffness

    basically if the stiffness of the foot surface interface changes stiffness the body will adjust leg stiffness (k-leg)

    softer surface stiffness - higher leg stiffness and vice versa

    So if the sensory input changes due to surface stiffness changes there will be motor response ( muscle flexion increases or decreases )

    So by changing the foot interface stiffness with a orthotic -----

    as read this thread - probably closely related in idea - Nigg's "Preferred Movement Path" Paradigm


    Hope that helps - interesting stuff this area
     
  3. timharmey

    timharmey Active Member

    Hi Mike
    Thanks for replying .My enquiry was caused by a physio friend introducing me to the work of a guy called E. Paul Zeher who is a professor for a biomedical research he is intrested in among other things , in how sesory input from the foot is important for regulating spinal cord motor output for walking.I have only read a couple of his papers , but it is eye opening.I have to admit I havent read the links you mentioned , I will over the weekend(Hopefully ).I would recommend you check this guy out , he has a website , which gives access to his papers
    Tim
     
  4. Tim do you have an address - I goggled DR E. Paul Zeher and got a link to Dr Dre?
     
  5. timharmey

    timharmey Active Member

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