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Shoe Deterioration as a Result of Complex Motor Tics in Tourette Syndrome

Discussion in 'General Issues and Discussion Forum' started by NewsBot, Jan 27, 2015.

  1. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.


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    Bilateral shoe deterioration as a result of complex motor tics in tourette syndrome.
    Mitchell JW, Cavanna AE
    J Neuropsychiatry Clin Neurosci. 2014 Apr 1;26(2):E22-3
    Full text letter to the editor
  2. Admin2

    Admin2 Administrator Staff Member

    Tourette syndrome

    Tourette syndrome (TS or simply Tourette's) is a common neuropsychiatric disorder with onset in childhood,[4] characterized by multiple motor tics and at least one vocal (phonic) tic. These tics characteristically wax and wane, can be suppressed temporarily, and are typically preceded by an unwanted urge or sensation in the affected muscles. Some common tics are eye blinking, coughing, throat clearing, sniffing, and facial movements. Tourette's does not adversely affect intelligence or life expectancy.

    Tourette's is defined as part of a spectrum of tic disorders, which includes provisional, transient and persistent (chronic) tics. While the exact cause is unknown, it is believed to involve a combination of genetic and environmental factors. There are no specific tests for diagnosing Tourette's; it is not always correctly identified because most cases are mild and the severity of tics decreases for most children as they pass through adolescence. Extreme Tourette's in adulthood, though sensationalized in the media, is a rarity; tics are often unnoticed by casual observers.

    In most cases, medication for tics is not necessary. Education is an important part of any treatment plan, and explanation and reassurance alone are often sufficient treatment.[2][5] Many individuals with Tourette's go undiagnosed or never seek medical care. Among those who are seen in specialty clinics, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and obsessive–compulsive disorder (OCD) are present at higher rates. These co-occurring diagnoses often cause more impairment to the individual than the tics; hence, it is important to correctly identify associated conditions and treat them.[6]

    About 1% of school-age children and adolescents have Tourette's.[3] It was once considered a rare and bizarre syndrome, most often associated with coprolalia (the utterance of obscene words or socially inappropriate and derogatory remarks), but this symptom is present in only a small minority of people with Tourette's.[2] The condition was named by Jean-Martin Charcot (1825–1893) on behalf of his resident, Georges Albert Édouard Brutus Gilles de la Tourette (1857–1904), a French physician and neurologist, who published an account of nine patients with Tourette's in 1885.

    Video explanation of tic disorders
    1. ^ a b c d e f g h "Tourette Syndrome Fact Sheet". NINDS. 16 April 2014. Archived from the original on March 23, 2005. Retrieved 18 October 2016. 
    2. ^ a b c Singer HS. "Tourette syndrome and other tic disorders". Handb Clin Neurol. 2011;100:641–57. doi:10.1016/B978-0-444-52014-2.00046-X PMID 21496613. Also see Singer HS. "Tourette's syndrome: from behaviour to biology". Lancet Neurol. 2005 Mar;4(3):149–59. doi:10.1016/S1474-4422(05)01012-4 PMID 15721825.
    3. ^ a b Cite error: The named reference Robertson2011 was invoked but never defined (see the help page).
    4. ^ Jankovic J. Movement Disorders, An Issue of Neurologic Clinics. The Clinics: Radiology: Elsevier, 2014, p. viii
    5. ^ Peterson BS, Cohen DJ. "The treatment of Tourette's Syndrome: multimodal, developmental intervention". J Clin Psychiatry. 1998;59 Suppl 1:62–72; discussion 73–74. PMID 9448671. Quote: "Because of the understanding and hope that it provides, education is also the single most important treatment modality that we have in TS." Also see Zinner 2000.
    6. ^ Du JC, Chiu TF, Lee KM, et al. "Tourette syndrome in children: an updated review". Pediatr Neonatol. 2010 Oct;51(5):255–64. doi:10.1016/S1875-9572(10)60050-2 PMID 20951354
  3. Boots n all

    Boots n all Well-Known Member

    Sounds like the client could have done with a simple Pedorthic modification, where we rap the soling material up and over the toe, this can then be repaired cost effectively at minimal cost as opposed to complete shoe replacement.

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